Egyptian media defiant over US aid suspension

The BBC's Katy Watson says Washington's move is more a "slap on the wrist" than a punishment

The Egyptian media have responded strongly to the decision by the US to suspend another instalment of military and financial aid to the military-backed government.

Some commentators say the US would lose out by cutting ties with Egypt, while others say that receiving aid is an affront to national sovereignty and advise the country to do without US aid altogether.

Front page headline in privately owned daily Al-Tahrir

"Let US aid go to hell."

Tariq Al-Hariri in Al-Tahrir

"The USA is carrying out a pressure campaign and massive and continued threats against Egypt, particularly the Armed Forces which responded to the people's will… It is very obvious that the USA considered its military aid as a tool enabling it to influence the Egyptian army which consequently has to listen to and obey orders coming from Washington."

Military expert Hamdi Bakhit in Al-Tahrir

"The US Administration won't be able to do without military ties with Egypt and will be the big loser if military aid is cut because it gets important privileges in the region as a result: primarily, safe passage in Egypt's airspace and securing its naval bases in the Suez Canal."

Economic expert Ahmad Al-Sayyid Al-Najjar in Al-Tahrir

"The continuation of US aid after the 25 January and 30 June revolutions is unacceptable… Egypt is the side that should end the shame of the poisonous US and European aid and should announce giving it up once and for all."

Commentator Abd-Al-Halim Qandil in Al-Tahrir

"US aid is considered to be a yoke of occupation and humiliation for Egypt and should be given up immediately… Egypt's national independence will be achieved after cancelling US aid and preventing its institutions from working in Egypt."

Editorial in privately owned daily Al-Yawm Al-Sabi

"It is not Egypt's place to put itself at the mercy of US aid which is always brandished by the US Administration to put pressure on Egypt… It is time to prepare ourselves to do without this aid in order to cast off the cloak of subordination that the USA wants us to keep wearing."

Military source quoted in Al-Yawm Al-Sabi

"The USA is carrying out a war against Egypt in two ways under the flexible pretext of democracy: firstly, to partially suspend military aid to Egypt and secondly, to back groups of terrorism, extremism and armed violence...It is now time to look for alternatives and international forces that are more influential and supportive of Egypt at the present time after this clear act of US enmity in which the Zionist lobby took part."

Well-known Egyptian TV presenter Jihan Mansur on Twitter

"The USA has no right to suspend military aid stipulated in the Egyptian-Israeli peace agreement as long as Egypt is committed to it."

Editor-in-chief of privately owned daily Al-Watan on Twitter

"The late president, Jamal abd-al-Nasir, said that aid is worthless and we say: You [USA], aid and the Muslim Brotherhood are less than worthless."

BBC Monitoring reports and analyses news from TV, radio, web and print media around the world. For more reports from BBC Monitoring, click here. You can follow BBC Monitoring on Twitter and Facebook.

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