Bombings in Iraq kill Shia pilgrims

Bodyguards protect the funeral cortege of Sunni MP Eifan Saadoun al-Issawi in Fallujah on Wednesday Sunni militants are thought to be behind recent attacks, including the assassination of a Sunni MP

Related Stories

A series of bomb attacks across Iraq has killed at least 12 people, most of them Shia pilgrims, officials say.

The worst incident was north of the capital, Baghdad, where two bombs, minutes apart, claimed the lives of at least seven pilgrims travelling to a shrine in the city of Samarra.

Four more Shia pilgrims were killed in an attack in Hilla, south of Baghdad.

No-one has claimed responsibility but Sunni insurgents have been blamed for the recent violence in Iraq.

Relations between the Sunni community and Shia-dominated government are becoming increasingly strained.

Sunni activists have been staging demonstrations against what they believe is discriminatory treatment by the government.

Although sectarian violence has decreased in Iraq since the height of the insurgency in 2006 and 2007, attacks are still common.

On Wednesday 42 people were killed in bombings - the deadliest day of the year so far.

Also on Wednesday, hundreds of people attended the funeral of a Sunni MP, Eifan Saadoun al-Issawi, a prominent member of the Awakening Council, which has been seen as a key factor in reducing sectarian violence.

Council members have often by targeted by Sunni militants linked to al-Qaeda.

More on This Story

Related Stories

More Middle East stories

RSS

Features

  • chocolate cake and strawberriesTrick your tongue

    Would this dessert taste different on a black plate?


  • Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince George leaving New Zealand'Great ambassadors'

    How New Zealand reacted to William, Kate - and George


  • Major Power Failure ident on BBC2Going live

    Why BBC Two's launch was not all right on the night


  • Front display of radio Strange echoes

    The mysterious 'numbers stations' left over from the Cold War era


  • A letter from a Somali refugee to a Syrian child'Be a star'

    Children's uplifting letters of hope to homeless Syrians


BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.