Inside Syria: Protest footage mapped

Anti-government protests in Syria which began in March have so far reportedly left more than 1,000 dead and hundreds injured.

Foreign journalists have not been allowed into Syria to report on the demonstrations against the rule of President Bashar al-Assad. Mobile-phone video of some of what has been happening has been uploaded onto websites.

A selection of this footage from the past month is shown on the map below. Click on the images to watch the clips, four of which have English subtitles.

Jisr al-Shoughour

Women fleeing Jisr al-Shughour in Syria curse President Bashar al-Assad and describe how their town was attacked by planes and tanks.

Women fleeing Jisr al-Shughour curse President Bashar al-Assad and describe how their town was attacked by planes and tanks. One woman says: "They poisoned our water and killed our men and children." Another tells how her cousins were killed and two of her children wounded.

Deraa

Unverified footage said to show tanks in the Syrian city of Deraa

An armoured vehicle is seen in this video of the suburbs of Deraa, the city where the protests first began on 15 March. The person taking the footage holds up a local newspaper to establish the date - 8 June.

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Hama

Unverified footage said to show protesters targetting snipers with water cannons in Hama

The person filming this protest in Hama states the date, 3 June, and location - outside the Ba'ath Party HQ. He says there are snipers on top of the roof and a water canon is being aimed at protesters. They chant insults at President Bashar al-Assad and warn others of snipers.

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Damascus

Demonstrators in Damascus call for end to oppression

A group of people sing national songs in Arnoos Square. A policeman is shown telling a woman to hand over her phone, but she refuses. At the end of the clip some people are filmed being bundled into a van and beaten.

Arbeen

Syrian protesters burn image of Bashar al-Assad

A crowd is filmed burning President Assad's picture chanting, "Leave!" In reference to a pro-government demonstration when an large national flag was paraded through the streets of Damascus, a white banner reads: "The Syrian flag was 2,300 meters long. Is that long enough to make shrouds for our martyrs?"

Damascus

This unverified footage shows pro-Assad rallies in Damascus

This video was taken at a pro-Assad rally in Damascus. It shows protesters holding pictures of the president and standing next to an large Syrian flag estimated to measure some 2.4km in length.

Kafr Nabil

A furious crowd of protesters in the small town of Kafr Nabl, Syria, attack photos of President Bashar al-Assad.

A furious crowd of protesters in the small town of Kafr Nabil attack photos of President Bashar al-Assad with sandals.

Daraya

Video footage showing protesters in Daraya, Syria, marching against the rule of President Bashar al-Assad.

Angry protesters wave banners and chant anti-Assad slogans in the town of Daraya, which saw demonstrators clash with militia and security forces last month.

While it is not possible to independently verify the footage, BBC Monitoring, the BBC Arabic Service and foreign bureaux believe them to be credible. They have translated the commentary, while places and people have been identified by landmarks, regional accents and clothing.

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