Nasrallah reveals Hariri murder 'evidence'

Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah speaks via video link - 9 August 2010 Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah addressed the press conference via video link

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The leader of the Lebanese militant group Hezbollah has made public what he says is evidence of Israeli involvement in the murder of former Lebanese PM Rafik Hariri in 2005.

Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah said the evidence included footage from Israeli spy planes of routes used by Mr Hariri.

But he said he would not hand the material to the tribunal investigating Mr Harari's death.

Israel has denied any involvement in Mr Hariri's death.

"I don't claim this is conclusive proof," Sheikh Nasrallah said during his news conference.

But he said it was "indicative" of Israeli involvement in the assassination of Mr Hariri.

He showed footage which he said was from Israeli spy planes, shot at different times from the 1990s to 2005.

He said the film showed many of the routes Mr Hariri frequently used in Beirut and other parts of the country - including the route that Mr Hariri took on the day he died - but did not show areas where Hezbollah had offices or any other presence.

Sheikh Nasrallah also revealed the name of a Lebanese man allegedly spying for Israel, who, he said, was at the site of the killing the day before the assassination.

The man, however, fled before authorities could detain him, he said.

Sheikh Nasrallah said he would not hand the evidence to the international tribunal investigating Mr Hariri's death, because he did not trust it.

Mr Hariri was killed in a massive explosion in 2005.

At the time, many Lebanese blamed Syria. Syria denied the accusation but eventually the killing led to the withdrawal of its troops from Lebanon.

Last month Sheikh Nasrallah said he had been told that the international tribunal would indict individuals from Hezbollah in Mr Hariri's murder, and described the tribunal as part of an Israeli plot against Hezbollah.

The tribunal has not yet said who will be indicted.

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