Guard dies of gunshot wounds at Swedish leader's home

Swedish Prime Minister Fredrik Reinfeldt in Brussels in October 2012 Swedish Prime Minister Fredrik Reinfeldt was not at home at the time of the shooting, police say

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A security guard is reported to have shot and killed himself inside the Swedish prime minister's residence.

Police have not yet given many details about the incident at the Sager Palace in Stockholm, but said "there are no signs of any crime".

Prime Minister Fredrik Reinfeldt was not in the building at the time, a government spokesperson said.

Television footage showed police and ambulances outside Mr Reinfeldt's waterfront home and office.

They were called at just after 13:00 (12:00 GMT).

Aftonbladet newspaper reported that the dead man had been found by a colleague who had just returned from lunch.

Initial reports suggested that a bodyguard - normally employed by the Swedish Security Service (Sapo) - had died, although this soon changed to security guard.

Security guards are employed by a private company to protect the building.

A Sapo spokesperson confirmed that the incident had not involved anyone from the agency.

"There is no indication that the incident has any link to the parliament or government," said Sirpa Franzen.

Police have not named the dead man, but have confirmed he had security clearance for the building.

"We investigate this as a suicide or a work-related accident," police spokeswoman Towe Hagg told Reuters news agency.

Mr Reinfeldt's spokesman Markus Friberg confirmed that the prime minister was not at home at the time.

"The prime minister is fine. He was at an external meeting," Mr Friberg said.

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