Italian parents turn to law to evict adult son

 
Venice (file image) A Venice court may be asked to issue a protection order for the parents

An Italian couple have sought legal help to persuade their 41-year-old son to fly the nest, Italian media reported.

The Venetian parents, who have not been named, say their son has a job but refuses to leave home and wants his clothes washed and his meals prepared.

They have sought help from lawyers at the consumer association Adico.

Lawyer Andrea Camp said a letter was sent to the son, advising him to leave home in six days or face legal action.

If he refuses, lawyers will ask a court in Venice to issue a protection order for the elderly parents against their son.

"We cannot do it any more," the father was quoted as saying.

"My wife is suffering from stress and had to be hospitalised. He [the son] has a good job but still lives at home.

"He demands that his clothes be washed and ironed and his meals prepared. He really has no intention of leaving."

Some reports said the son had also become aggressive.

The couple turned to Adico after hearing of a similar case earlier this month in which Adico persuaded a son to leave home. After he left, his parents changed the locks.

Adico says hundreds of Italian families face similar problems getting adult children to leave home.

 

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  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 160.

    I agree with the parents wholeheartedly, those comments advocating that it is fine to remain with your parents a lot longer are wrong. At 41 this man should know better.
    I am 22 and have been living on my own since 19 and before then i was doing my own chores cooking etc.
    absence makes the heart grow fonder

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 159.

    @145: Errrr, maybe because not everyone's parents are rolling in it?

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 158.

    he should have been chucked out sooner. wouldn't be so bad if he wasn't abusive. and even then he should have been made and taught how to do cook and clean himself- so the parents haven't been strict enough to do that.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 157.

    Really sad state of affairs. From what I have read, adult children refusing to move out is becoming more and more common in Europe.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 156.

    I moved out in my early 20's once I got a well enough paying job, but due to redundancy I moved back in with my folks. I told them 3 months after I got a job I would be set to move out again. Low and behold I was working within a month of moving back again and 3 months after starting work I was back in my own place again. Blame the people whos parents buy large houses or flats and rent them out

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 155.

    Amusing story... When I was 18 I moved into my girl friends place to try it out, and the next day my Mum bought a dog, so I couldn't go back! I'm very allergic to animals!

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 154.

    I can only assume they do his washing, ironing and prepare his meals etc, so they only have themselves to blame.

    Many people stay at home with their parents for a lot longer these days, which of course is ok so long as they contribute to the running of the home etc.

  • rate this
    -2

    Comment number 153.

    I live in my own house but every year call my retired parents from India for 6 months. My mum do all the cooking and cleaning for me while my dad does the washing, ironing and weekly shopping. Sometime i do make breakfast for them on Sundays. They have no complaints as far as they have time to spend with their grandchildren. I hope they always stay in good health.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 152.

    What short memories peopel have. My Dad tells of when he was growing up when 3 of his grown up brothers and sisters were still living in the family home. They all had work and his elder brothers also had wives and children. This was in 1950's liverpool and they were saving to get the money to move into their own places. The only way he got out was to join the army....... cont.....

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 151.

    As soon as I started at University, having chosen to take my degree in my home town, I started to make a contribution towards family expenses. When I did leave home to do my doctorate, my parents went out and bought a dishwasher, as they suddenly realised that they'd have to do their own washing-up! I still contributed when at home or on family holidays, until I left to get married.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 150.

    @130- there wasn't enough space to properly cavaet my comment however, my point (#125) was a broader one and not specifically aimed at the facts of this case.
    Obviously if a member of the family does not pull his/her weight the family would collectively try to find a way out rather than taking a basic matter like this to court.

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 149.

    @ 145 Hmmm

    I'm guessing because having your parents 'buy you a flat' is not a very common situation to find yourself in!

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 148.

    Yet Again the BBC choses to allow comments on such a silly story but not on The Dale Farm Story.

  • Comment number 147.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 146.

    @141. lelboy

    Exactly. I'm happy enough - for the moment - to have them with us. It's not really out of a sense of responsibility for them - I stopped feeling that when they finished uni. At that time I considered that we'd really done all we were actually obliged to do for them. But they're still our kids and they can stay for as long as it's convenient for us to have them.

  • rate this
    -7

    Comment number 145.

    My parents bought me a flat when I turned 21 and I rent out the other 3 rooms to my friends so basically have a double income, it so much easier I don't know why more peopel don't do it...?

    Italians need to grow up.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 144.

    It's probable that the parents have been too generous and family-orientated, but I note from some of the comments here, that we have also maybe gone too far down the other road. Our social cohesion has been strained for some time and the answer is usually that family ties aren't strong enough. In this case the youth is a bad-un, but the Italian view of family, could help ease UK's issues.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 143.

    A few years ago an excellent French film was made on the topic: "Tanguy" from Patrice Leconte, with Andre Dussolier and Sabine Azema in the role of the parents. It is a comedy but a good illustration.

  • rate this
    +6

    Comment number 142.

    114.
    Mikey T
    1 Hour ago

    'I swear to you, the parents have a responsibility - I see no issue with what this poor child has done - I feel sorry for him'

    He's not a child! He's 41!!

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 141.

    67.
    The Flyer
    Just so. There's not a problem - I think - with children (!) staying at home if the parents are happy with it, and that they pay a fair contribution - which incidentally will prepare them, in part, for the harsh financial realities of life: this is something that some younger "stay at homes" fail to realise: it costs money to live - without parental freebies.

 

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