Bury Lenin, say Russians in online poll

File picture of Vladimir Lenin's body inside his mausoleum on Red Square in Moscow Lenin's embalmed body has been on public display since his death in 1924

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An online poll organised by Russia's ruling party suggests there is strong support for burying Lenin's body.

Of more than 250,000 people who have voted in the poll, two-thirds so far say Lenin should now be buried.

The revolutionary leader's embalmed body has been on display in a mausoleum in Red Square in Moscow since his death in 1924.

The debate about what to with his body resurfaces with every anniversary of his death - on 21 January 1924.

The unofficial poll was set up by some members of parliament for United Russia (UR), the party of Prime Minister Vladimir Putin.

'Hot topic'

"It's well known that Lenin himself did not plan to put up any mausoleums to himself, and his living relatives, his brother and sister, were categorically against [this]," one of the party's deputies, Vladimir Medinsky, was quoted as saying on the poll's website.

A top party official, Andrei Vorobyov, denied however that the call to bury Lenin reflected the party's official policy.

"It's the initiative of individual party members, but it is a hot topic in society," Mr Vorobyov, head of the party's central executive committee, told the RIA Novosti news agency.

"According to Christian rites and the logic of life, it is going to happen sooner or later," he added.

Close to 270,000 people have so far voted in the poll, which was set up on Saturday.

Mr Putin has said it should be up to the people to decide.

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