India

Indian media: Interest in 'militant' arrest

Delhi police arrested Abdul Karim Tunda on Friday
Image caption Delhi police arrested Abdul Karim Tunda on Friday

Media are giving front-page coverage to the arrest and interrogation of an alleged "high-profile militant", who police say played an important role in terror attacks in many Indian cities.

Police in Delhi say they arrested Abdul Karim Tunda near India's border with Nepal on Friday over his alleged links with Pakistan-based banned militant group Lashkar-e-Taiba.

The Hindustan Times says Tunda "dropped big names" during questioning. The Times of India quotes an interrogator as saying that Tunda "plays the role of a recruiter, motivator and also takes care of the logistics" of the group..

Mr Tunda, however, has made no public statement so far about the charges against him.

Meanwhile, newspapers are also expressing concern over the poor state of India's economy and urging the government and financial policy-makers to work together to put the country back on a trajectory of growth.

"Statements from different officials have conveyed the impression that India's central bank, the Reserve Bank of India, is not on the same page as the government. This has spread confusion and undermined the efficacy of monetary policy. Signals from monetary policy are most effectively transmitted when communication is clear," The Times of India, in an editorial, says.

The Tribune feels "foreign investors' faith in the Indian economy and political leadership's ability to accelerate growth has taken a hit. The focus has to be on how to attract and retain foreign money… If political parties cooperate, important legislation can be passed and more areas opened to foreign investment."

Staying with financial news, the Hindustan Times reports that the government is planning to propose new tax arrangements for India's "super-rich".

"The government is gearing up for an overhaul of India's tax regime by widening the "super-rich" net, re-working existing arrangements and introducing a wealth tax on expensive watches, painting and other works of art," the paper says.

Iran deadlock

Moving on to foreign affairs, the diplomatic deadlock over Iran's detention of an Indian merchant ship has entered its seventh day, The Times of India reports.

Iran detained the MV Desh Shanti oil tanker last Tuesday, saying it was leaking oil and causing "widespread pollution" in the Persian Gulf, something Indian officials deny.

"The Indian embassy in Tehran is proactively engaged in talks with Iran officials for the release of the ship. There has been no pollution by the ship and we expect some positive development," the paper quotes a Shipping Corporation of India official as saying.

Elsewhere, 18 Indian athletes are set to return home from the Asian Youth Games being held in Nanjing, China, after they were found too old to compete in the event, the NDTV website reports.

The departure of the athletes is a "big embarrassment for the nation" and leaves the 27-member athletics squad "severely depleted", the website says.

But age is no bar for TD Krishnamachari of Chennai, who has topped a Master's course in journalism at the age of 78, The Times of India reports.

"I want to know something about everything. It helps me negotiate the challenges of life," says Mr Krishnamachari, who has worked as a teacher, corporate adviser, news presenter and yoga instructor, in addition to holding a PhD in Sanskrit and a Masters' degrees in mathematics.

And finally, the world's shortest woman has released the world's biggest book, the CNN-IBN website reports.

Jyoti Amge, who is less than 25 inches tall, released Jain religious writer Tarun Sagar's "Kadve Pravachan" (Bitter Utterances), a book measuring 30 feet by 24 feet and weighing 2,000 kilograms, on Sunday in Jaipur, the report adds.

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