Are the Gandhi-Kallenbach letters headed home?

 
Gandhi and Kallenbach (middle row, centre) at Tolstoy Farm, South Africa, 1910 A rare picture of Gandhi and Kallenbach (middle row, centre) at Tolstoy Farm, South Africa, 1910

"He is more than an acolyte, less than an equal", wrote Pulitzer-winning author Joseph Lelyveld of Hermann Kallenbach, a Jewish architect of Lithuanian background, who struck a deep friendship with Mahatma Gandhi during his time in South Africa.

In Great Soul: Mahatma Gandhi and His Struggle With India, Mr Lelyveld describes the relationship between the men as "the most intimate, also ambiguous" one of Gandhi's lifetime. This was provocation enough for the government in the leader's native state of Gujarat to ban the book last year.

But it was certainly a curious friendship.

Kallenbach, who was also a gymnast and body builder, sent Gandhi "logical and charming love notes", which the latter destroyed. Using parliamentary phrases, Gandhi described Kallenbach, two years younger to him, as "Lower House", while the latter fondly called his friend, who had a veto on most things, as "Upper House".

Though locals gossiped that Gandhi had left his wife to live with a man, a Gandhian scholar told Mr Lelyveld that their relationship was "homoerotic" rather than homosexual. Kallenbach, in fact, wrote to his brother in Germany in 1908 - shortly after moving in with Gandhi - that, following his friend's abstemious ways, he had stopped eating fish and having sex.

'Priceless'

More importantly, Gandhi described Kallenbach as a "man of strong feelings, wide sympathies and childlike sympathy". Mr Lelyveld wrote that the architect's commitment to Gandhian values appeared to be "wholehearted, not selective".

More evidence of this fascinating relationship may soon be finally heading home to India's archives.

Thousands of letters, papers and photographs relating to Gandhi, belonging to the Kallenbach family, are due to be auctioned by Sotheby's in England next Tuesday. The auction house estimates the collection, which is arranged in 18 files, is expected to fetch between £500,000-£700,000 ($777,000-$1.1m).

The Gandhi-Kallenbach archive The selection is a rich repository of letters, gifts and pictures

But a highly placed official in the culture ministry tells me that the government is close to securing a deal with the auction house to buy this archive. This was partly prompted by a report submitted by reputed historians and manuscript experts who visited London recently to examine the selection, and strongly advised the government to bid for it.

One of the team members told me the archive was "very well preserved and of inestimable value". India is possibly paying $1.1 million for the papers, a source tells me.

The selection contains five decades of correspondence, much of it unpublished, between Gandhi and Kallenbach dating between 1905 and 1945.

They talk about legal cases, their mutual interest in Tolstoy, and their time together on a eponymous communal settlement called Tolstoy Farm.

There are references to Gandhi's early political campaigns and his relationship with and the illness of his wife, Kasturba: "I no longer want to be angry with her so she is sweet."/"She had a few grapes today but she is suffering again. It seems to be me she is gradually sinking".

There is insight into Gandhi's preparations for his return to India: "I do all my writing squatting on the ground and eat invariably with my fingers. I don't want to look awkward in India".

Kallenbach's letters talk about his growing concern about the spread of Nazism and the plight of Jews in Europe.

There are also letters by Gandhi's sons and cousins, writer and Tolstoy translator IF Mayo. There are documents relating to the purchase of Tolstoy Farm, fruit trees, ensuring water supply and even arguments with neighbours over grazing rights.

The selection even contains gifts from Gandhi to Kallenbach: a flag, a khaki cotton scarf, a spinning wheel. The icing on the cake is a collection of 287 priceless pictures, many featuring Gandhi, Kallenbach and his followers.

The archive is a key biographical source for Gandhi, says Gabriel Heaton, Sotheby's deputy director and a specialist in books and manuscripts. And if all goes well, this invaluable piece of India's history will come home - to Delhi's National Archives - later this month. This is excellent news.

 
Soutik Biswas Article written by Soutik Biswas Soutik Biswas Delhi correspondent

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  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 19.

    Mr Gandhi was a Mahatma to everyone in the world except to Kasturba. In my opinion he was a male chauvinist when it came to his wife."I no longer want to be angry with her so she is sweet."- This line gives a glimpse of his attitude towards her.Having said that, I suppose, the great man a prisoner of his own upbringing from which I think he managed to unshackle himself, albeit rather late in life.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 18.

    Banning books is not something new for Governments in various Indian states. Gujarat bans books related to Gandhi, Maharashtra bans something related to Shivaji. The sole motive behind bidding for the archive seems to avoid even more -- alleged -- embarrassing details of Gandhi's love life being out in the open. Or worse, somebody coming up with another book and the government banning it too.

  • rate this
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    Comment number 17.

    Gandhi's time in South Africa was not all rosy as many would like it to be. He had a dark side which he rubbed off the history books

  • rate this
    -2

    Comment number 16.

    Will Mr Ghost rider ask the British Govt. to pay compensation to the Indian people who were killed by British bullets in unarmed condition and forced to die due to starvation from 1757 to 1947 during that a glorious past?

  • rate this
    -2

    Comment number 15.

    I understand Mr Ghost rider is so much sympathiser about the street living Indian migrants. Why is he not sympathiser about millions of people in India? Will he ask British Govt. to return back the gold & diamond what they looted from India?

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 14.

    Instead the Indian governmment worrying about paying the family of Kallenbach. They should used that money at least to slove problem of some indian migrants sleeping in streets in UK. http://mycontinent.co/illegal.php

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 13.

    Indian Govt & family of Hermann Kallenbach struck a deal for papers relating to the German Jew's correspondence with Mahatma Gandhi some 13 days before auction. Negotiations with Kallenbach's descendants were tough demanding $1 million, $3 million & even $5M. Nonetheless, correspondence will soon be handed over to India.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 12.

    Lelyveld’s discussion of Gandhi’s friendship with Hermann Kallenbach is likely to disturb, especially in India where homosexuality was criminal til 2009. Yet book is clear Gandhi’s celibacy was based brahmacharya, or self-imposed celibacy. He performed actions polluting or degrading (like living with untouchables) thereby offering new definitions of what was uplifting & purifying.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 11.

    As for Joseph Lelyveld’s book, “Great Soul: Mahatma Gandhi & His Struggle With India”. Book seems concerned with transition Hindu lawyer from conservative merchant caste into Mahatma - figure part politician & part saint, who renewed ancient tradition of Hindu asceticism in the hope of bringing social/spiritual transformation. To worldwide readers “Great Soul” will come as a revelation.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 10.

    After auction announcement, Indian Govt sent 5-member team to London under Mushirul Hasan, DG, National Archives of India, to examine items. The team, which included historians & manuscript experts, submitted a three-page report certifying items as "priceless". No doubt, if India has (or does) acquire these documents & pictures, a new chapter of Indian history & heritage will open up.
    Exciting.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 9.

    Indian Govt is in intense negotiations with Hermann Kallenbach's family to buy memorabilia related to Mahatma Gandhi. Sotheby's London had invited bids for a July 10 auction. Apparently interest is keen. I had thought India had already acquired collection for $3M (R4.5 crore). Indian government doesn't enter into bids; there was a price ceiling India could not exceed.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 8.

    I just dont understand how come sotheby's in london get the right to sell this ? they have no right to acquire any family's personal belongings let alone the father of a biggest democratic country in the world, a global super power. Is this another way of extracting money from a economically booming country? They obviously know that anything related to India will cause a lot of interest!

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 7.

    mmmm.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 6.

    no doubt govt. should bring all that is related to the father of our nation but it will be far more better if the govt. shows such interest in applying his ideals too.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 5.

    What a relief that those letters are coming back where they belong! I don't know what Lelyveld's intention was in writing that book. If the intent was to assure good sales by appealing to people's prurient interests, it was in poor taste. There is so much of interest in Gandhi, across the world, and perhaps the Pulitzer winner thought that he would cash in on this!

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 4.

    This is salacious curiosity about the sex life of a truly remarkable man, who has been dead for about 65 years. Do we care? I guess that a mere four posts (including this one) in four hours answers that question quite nicely.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 3.

    Good all Gandhi

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 2.

    They live on, I hope it's not empty :)

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 1.

    How did Sotheby's get this? Cant Gandhi's family ask for their fathers letters for free cause it is their family belonging?

 

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