Chinese court orders woman to visit mother

 
This 1 July picture shows a woman surnamed Chu (L), 77, attending the hearing of a case against her daughter and husband in Wuxi, east China's Jiangsu province. The 77-year-old woman sued her daughter, state media reported

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A Chinese court has ordered a woman to visit her mother once every two months, state media say, in the first case since a new law on parental visits came into effect on Monday.

The judgement was issued by a court in Wuxi, after a 77-year-old woman brought the case against her daughter.

The court also ruled that the daughter and her husband had to provide financial help, reports said.

The new visitation law has provoked both debate and ridicule online.

Called the "Elderly Rights Law", it is intended to tackle the growing problem of lonely elderly people by ordering adult children to visit their ageing parents.

But many have questioned how it can be enforced, given that the frequency of visits is not spelled out.

Other internet commentators say it intrudes into areas that should be governed by personal choice.

In this case, Xinhua reported that the elderly mother sued her daughter after she refused to care for her any more following a row.

China Daily said the hearing on Monday in Wuxi was held "to highlight the implementation of the law".

"Filial piety, considered a key virtue of traditional Chinese culture, generally means respect for one's parents and ancestors, including being good to one's parents and fulfilling one's duty to take care of them," the paper said.

The law was aimed primarily "at urging all of society to pay more attention to elders", it quoted a professor of population studies as saying.

China's population is aging and in recent years there have been a number of cases of elderly people being poorly treated or neglected that have shocked the nation.

 

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  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 90.

    @Marson

    "Having helped change their child into an economic entity, the government has reason to protect the parents."

    What a comment! i would write down it on my notebook, this is a wondeful economist comment relate to this issue, it should be Editors'Picks straight

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 89.

    Nobody asked to be born into this world.That was your parents' decision whether by choice or by careless accident.Whether you owe your parents or anyone else anything except perhaps your own children you brought into the world depends on how you see life.If you feel you are a sacrificial animal, then you are born into original sin and owe for your entire life.If not, you don't owe anyone anything.

  • Comment number 88.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 87.

    I too am quite shocked at the number of negative comments about this issue.
    During my graduation ceremony, Bill Bryson quoted that while the students had no doubt put a lot of effort into the last 3/4 years, they had no doubt BEEN a lot of effort to their backing parents over their lives.
    Having helped change their child into an economic entity, the government has reason to protect the parents.

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 86.

    Shame on all those looking for excuses not to visit parents!!! the sacrifices your parents made for you through the years, the love and caring you were given. I was live 1500 miles away when my father became ill and died. I regret that I was not closer to him that I could not see him frequently. After that we moved closer to my mother so that I was able to get to her to visit.

  • rate this
    +4

    Comment number 85.

    @Alan:

    That because their parents have been abused/not well-treated by their parents, it created a vicious circle. China is also risk at this vicious circle, the Government is smart enough to notice the "change", they promote movies, TV series, at least i saw this is Good "propaganga.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 84.

    No care for the elderly is one of many symptoms of a society desperate to modernize and grow its economy at ANY price.The cost for dealing with these problems would price China's cheap labor based economy out of the market.The cost for not dealing with them is China is becoming uninhabitable.Economists who sit at desks with computers projecting recent growth out forever live in their own world.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 83.

    Wow, thats me sorted then

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 82.

    I'm quite shocked to see so many people complaining about being abused/not well-treated by their parents. It is never been this bad in China.

    Chinese parents do much much more for their child, and the child has much more responsibilities to look after old parents. To put your parents into care home is a shameful thing for many Chinese, even you pay for it.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 81.

    @L_CM
    There are many things China need to learn from western cutlture, but each western culture is different to others, we need to be more selective in terms of bringing some good ideas to home. I think the most important for China now is to build many affordable homes in next 10 years, as housing costs remain a colleguing issue for China's young generation

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 80.

    73. stoneyfarmer

    My point refers to when human rights and freedoms are being exploited. What these rights are, how much freedom one has & what freedom is, and what exploited means - are difficult questions, I accept.

    But in the case of this article, it strikes me people need the freedom to visti, or if they wish, not to visit. I feel sorry for those made to visit if they don't want to.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 79.

    The first sign of terminal decline of a community is when it ignore problems at home in favour of gossiping about problems afar. Good luck.

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 78.

    @Alan:

    who marked Alan's comment down is a shame, what he said it's fact, there is a cutlture difference, hard to explain, only the one who spent 10 more years in the other country can tell. many of Chinese young generation studied abroad, someone just totally lost themselves, i have seen many here, right time for government to act.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 77.

    73. stoneyfarmer

    "My children…(are the glories of glory thanks to me)
    My brother's children…(are barbarians, thanks to…)
    I live in the UK, he lives in America."

    Oh good. I was concerned America wouldn't get kicked on this one.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 76.

    Left home at 15 because of sustained verbal and physical abuse. I am now 66 and and have never returned. I would rather go to jail than have anything to do with my parents.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 75.

    Great ! you see the essence, it's outrageous that governor pass the buck to only child.we bear so hard burden in the background of lacking normal security .

  • rate this
    -2

    Comment number 74.

    I think Chinese society has a lot to learn from the West. They need to create a better social security nets for disadvantaged people including poor elders. But it's still a developing country. I don't think the point of raising children is for them to take care of you when you get old. I agree this law has to do with Chinese culture where treating your parents poorly are really frowned upon.

  • rate this
    +7

    Comment number 73.

    The reasonable one @ 69 says:
    ".. reason, logic, human rights and freedom. We are all humans on the same planet, not all of us have a voice

    My children have a voice and I listen within reason but maintain control.

    My brother's children have very loud voices and they shout until they win.

    I live in the UK, he lives in America.

    Each to his own or do you want to adjudicate?

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 72.

    I think the culture difference is parents in China are willing to spend every penny, literal everything they have on their children, especially to get the best education they can afford. So they might not have savings.

    On the other hand, children also have moral obligation to look after their parents.

    It's different to British culture, so I can understand why people feel the law is strange.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 71.

    "after a 77-year-old woman brought the case against her daughter."

    Behold the queen of all control-freak mothers.

 

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