Chinese court orders woman to visit mother

 
This 1 July picture shows a woman surnamed Chu (L), 77, attending the hearing of a case against her daughter and husband in Wuxi, east China's Jiangsu province. The 77-year-old woman sued her daughter, state media reported

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A Chinese court has ordered a woman to visit her mother once every two months, state media say, in the first case since a new law on parental visits came into effect on Monday.

The judgement was issued by a court in Wuxi, after a 77-year-old woman brought the case against her daughter.

The court also ruled that the daughter and her husband had to provide financial help, reports said.

The new visitation law has provoked both debate and ridicule online.

Called the "Elderly Rights Law", it is intended to tackle the growing problem of lonely elderly people by ordering adult children to visit their ageing parents.

But many have questioned how it can be enforced, given that the frequency of visits is not spelled out.

Other internet commentators say it intrudes into areas that should be governed by personal choice.

In this case, Xinhua reported that the elderly mother sued her daughter after she refused to care for her any more following a row.

China Daily said the hearing on Monday in Wuxi was held "to highlight the implementation of the law".

"Filial piety, considered a key virtue of traditional Chinese culture, generally means respect for one's parents and ancestors, including being good to one's parents and fulfilling one's duty to take care of them," the paper said.

The law was aimed primarily "at urging all of society to pay more attention to elders", it quoted a professor of population studies as saying.

China's population is aging and in recent years there have been a number of cases of elderly people being poorly treated or neglected that have shocked the nation.

 

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  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 30.

    Humans don't always like each other. Sometimes relatives don't like each other. One cannot suggest people "should" (a very certain claim) visit parents and give them money. Why not live your life knowing that, subject to how they feel, your children may not want to visit and support you. It is not axiomatic that they will want to and forcing it may not help.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 29.

    Lets wait for someone in the current government to wake and interdouce a law here in the UK - with the hope of saving yes billions of pounds

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 28.

    My son lives in Australia so he would find it particularly onerous to visit me every two months. Instead, we keep in touch online.

  • rate this
    -2

    Comment number 27.

    In the UK, as soon as your parents get old they're shifted to an old people's home and their old room fitted out with a pool table!
    The West has an awful lot to learn about morality and values from countries like China.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 26.

    Among China's many long term unsolvable problems is an aging population for which adequate care facilities cannot be provided. This in a culture that traditionally reveres the elderly. So the government has put the onus on their children. The one child policy and massive internal long distance migration to jobs makes the hardship even greater.How could such absurd laws possibly be widely enforced?

  • rate this
    +4

    Comment number 25.

    Sounds like slavery to me.
    Parents can just be nice to their kids instead in order to keep a strong connection later in life.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 24.

    I can sort of understand why they made such a law. China is very different society than the ones in the West. Social safety nets by the government for seniors are inadequate to take care of them. Plus, there's a very strong tradition for Children to "take care" of their parents when they became old in Chinese culture. But I just wonder what if the children live far away from their parents?

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 23.

    What if the parent has abused the child - will they still have to visit?

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 22.

    Unless you have parents who literally abused you in a severe and inhuman fashion, starved you, beat you, bullied you, denied your basic rights, made it a habit to humiliate you in public and cursed you, you owe your parent the basic human courtesy of kindness when they are decrepit. Emotional abuse is also abuse, so if you have been abused, naturally, you are exempt. Abusing children is vicious.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 21.

    .

    My Chinese friend got a 1st class degree because of her parents 'help', she's also on her third mental breakdown.

    .

  • Comment number 20.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 19.

    I would have thought a relationship in which people are suing each other is one that's broken down past the point of repair.

    This case has the whiff of a 'Good Wife' plot about it, and it's not the kind of thing I'd have associated with China, but with here or the US....

    However, I'd praise the Chinese authorities for at least trying to tackle the issue of inter-generational relations like this.

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 18.

    The role of the state in people's private lives must be reduced to an absolute minimum and this is one case where the state has no right to poke its nose. You visit the people you want to, it's your choice. You didn't choose your parents, you are a product of them and as such have NO moral obligation to them. If you like them fine, if you dont like them you have the option to not see them at all.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 17.

    I think it is cruel to force people together. It is completely nonsensical to do it solely because they are related. You can’t assert they "should" visit/give money, or "should" want to, simply because they are related.

    I want to be free to talk and give money to who I want.

    This is an outrageous lack of freedom.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 16.

    It's terrible to think that daughters and sons have to be obliged to visit and take care of their own parents. Very sad indeed to see what kind of persons we have become. Even animals show more compassion and caring for their own. For those who have children, teach them well, leave better human beings for the future.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 15.

    This should be something which is deeply engrained in the culture and society... but not the law.

    But this is coming from a person living in a country where one city has an area with 60% of children living without a father.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 14.

    Whilst it is a good idea for children to visit their elderly parents... not sure that enforcement by law is the best way forward. The best type of visits are those that emanate from loving hearts, not because the Government says you must do it.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 13.

    China use to be extremely family oriented. Now that the economy needs young workers many of them have left their homes and villages for the large industrial cities. The elderly are left behind to fend for themselves. Due to the new lack of respect and obligations to help the elderly out, china has enacted certain laws which force the young visit their elderly parents. Soc sec doesn't exist either

  • Comment number 12.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 11.

    Children should feel obligated to visit and support their parents, due to duty and hopefully love. However if they do not have a naturally good relationship, legally forcing contact is hardly going to produce a healthy atmosphere.

 

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