China's 'memory holes' swallow up Melissa Chan

 
A picture of al-Jazeera correspondent Melissa Chan in their China bureau office in Beijing

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The idea of the "unperson", whose existence is erased from all records by the state, comes from George's Orwell's novel 1984.

Today Melissa Chan, the al-Jazeera English television correspondent who, it was announced yesterday, had been expelled from China, seems to have become an "unperson" in China.

The only Chinese-language newspapers in which we could find reports on the expulsion on Wednesday morning were the Hong Kong-affiliated Ta Kung Pao paper from Henan province and the Global Times.

The decision not to grant her a new visa, effectively kicking her out, was made by the Foreign Ministry, and was significant. China has not taken such a step since 1998.

At the Foreign Ministry's daily press conference on Tuesday, 14 out of 18 questions were about the decision, some of which were helpfully recorded by Voice Of America.

Reporters wanted to know why Melissa Chan had been expelled, what rule she had broken and whether this was some sort of warning to all of us.

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The problem with the head in the sand approach is that China has left itself voiceless, while in today's YouTube world all Ms Chan's reports are preserved online”

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Today, the Foreign Ministry's own website, which usually carries a transcript of each daily briefing seems to have expunged Ms Chan's case from the official record. There is no English transcript, just a Chinese one, and that makes no mention of any of the questions about her. Only the four other questions are recorded. The video story on the Chinese page is about the Philippines.

So China's government is in the bizarre position of having censored itself.

US 'disappointed'

There wasn't much in China's responses anyway. Foreign Ministry spokesman Hong Lei refused to explain why she had been denied a new visa, saying only "the media concerned know in their heart what they did wrong".

That unfortunately isn't much help when it comes to trying to report China's position or to work out where other correspondents might fall foul of the Foreign Ministry in the future.

The most widely circulated idea is that what China really objected to was a documentary, produced not by Ms Chan but a different department at al-Jazeera, about the alleged use of prison labour to manufacture products for export, and she is being punished despite having no link to the story.

China's move has drawn protests from organisations including the US state department. In a regular briefing, deputy spokesman Mark Toner said the department was "disappointed in the Chinese government".

"To our knowledge she operated and reported in accordance with Chinese law," he said.

The Foreign Correspondents' Club of China, often the target of official ire itself, said in its own statement that it was "the most extreme example of a recent pattern of using journalist visas in an attempt to censor and intimidate foreign correspondents in China". It details other cases where visas have been delayed, denied or never issued.

In 1984, George Orwell wrote about the "memory holes" down which inconvenient documents were dropped to be erased from history. This case seems to be the equivalent.

The problem with the head-in-the-sand approach is that China has left itself voiceless, while in today's YouTube world all Ms Chan's reports are preserved online. So anyone (outside China, or with VPN technology to skirt the online censors if they are inside China) can access them and judge for themselves.

 
Damian Grammaticas Article written by Damian Grammaticas Damian Grammaticas China correspondent

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  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 135.

    115.M_Paire
    Typing in all caps and yelling doesn't mean you have freedom of speech, but it definitely puts your netiquette into question.
    typing in all caps, meaning emphasizing! One of the core netiquette is RESPECTING OTHER PEOPLE, & KEEP FLAME WARS UNDER CONTROL.
    @ CXu
    Why would I bother to post anything about bo xi lai or the blind man? Instead, I would challenge you to ask Theresa May why Mr. Neil Heywood's Chinese wife was not granted visa for the UK when he applied for before he died. He could have been still living with his family happily in his country which refused his wife's visa.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 134.

    How can I make a comment on your latest rubbish article?

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 133.

    @33 et al.
    The idea that suppression is a Maoist innovation only shows the ignorance of the post writers. Suppression has been the constant tool of every Chinese dynasty ever since Ying Zheng made himself the First Emperor of Qin. Even the Tang, the most open dynasty China ever, ran pogroms against Buddhists and Daoists. Not that that makes suppression any better.
    @1
    Having lived in China for more than 12 years I find this post a fair summary of ordinary Chinese attitudes. Those attitudes arose long before 1949 and are found in most overseas Chinese communities too. Go and ask them!

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 132.

    @130, @131

    interesting, surely not some anti-China moderators at the objective and impartial BBC?

    Let's respond the same again to no.131 shall we? though not verbatim, here we go with the Russia=China nonsense:

    1. British fighter jets scrambles against chinese military aircraft probing british airspace.

    2. Chinese espionage conducting assasinations on UK soil.

    3. Chinese gas supplies to europe deliberately disrupted.

    4. Chinese threatens pre-emptive attacks on NATO missile sites.

    5. Chinese nuclear warheads programme for British cities.

    Substituting 'Russia' with 'China'. Stupidity.

  • Comment number 131.

    This comment has been referred for further consideration. Explain.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 130.

    You substitute the name China with Russia, and it will give you precisely the same results. It is no wonder, when both countries are still staunchest defenders of everything communist.

  • Comment number 129.

    This comment has been referred for further consideration. Explain.

  • Comment number 128.

    This comment has been referred for further consideration. Explain.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 127.

    .

    @Lata

    "How long will this hate against Chinese going to continue? It really makes me sick. All the news you read on BBC about China is more than 90% negative."

    ____


    I think the BBC gives China an easy ride, Die Welt on the other hand isn't fussy about what they publish and some of the articles can be quite insulting. Best cover your eyes and block your ears, China has lots to criticize and we love free speech!

    .

    .

  • Comment number 126.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 125.

    121.chinkinthearmour

    "You have fantasies above your station which you have been desperate to project on this forum. Remarkably you ... revealed your lack of reading and absence of neurological improvement.

    The qualities you do possess include characteristics of nazism and deception which you are also keen to entitle upon other readers.

    ... refreshing to note that you are always keen to embarrass yourself publicly. Do take care when you do so physically in public lest you suffer arrestment.[sic]"

    ____


    You come across as unstable and a bit illiterate! Why's that?

    .

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 124.

    @ 117, @120

    don't lose sleep over this.

    comments generally pretend to possess academic gravitas, while corporations and governments pretend to have public rows yet continue to sign deals far into the future.

    In other words 'they' are too busy getting rich to worry about blogs, while bloggers are too busy with comments to worry about self advancement.

  • Comment number 123.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 122.

    @Lata re:#77 No, not at all. I read BBC everyday. I'm quite sure there were only 89% negative about China, not 90%. :-) @luckystar1206

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 121.

    @ 66 @ 75

    You have fantasies above your station which you have been desperate to project on this forum. Remarkably you managed to regress over time and each time successfully revealed your lack of reading and absence of neurological improvement.

    The qualities you do possess include characteristics of nazism and deception which you are also keen to entitle upon other readers.

    Nonetheless your postings presents comedy and it is refreshing to note that you are always keen to embarrass yourself publicly. Do take care when you do so physically in public lest you suffer arrestment.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 120.

    Pollcurd, #117, I'm with you there. I woke up to see if there was any further debate in these comments. I was disappointed. Damian's article was about the expulsion of Melissa Chan. With a few exceptions, all I see is fluff about how China is great, the West is bad and the BBC is biased against China...

  • Comment number 119.

    This comment has been referred for further consideration. Explain.

  • Comment number 118.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • rate this
    -2

    Comment number 117.

    Frankly, the comments on this piece are embarassing.
    Can I just clear the air, and mention that this is written by an individual, who has every right to share his views on the topic. (The idea of totally unbiased reporting is, at the very best, a facade)
    Secondly, the wumao brigade are painfully obvious, and should head elsewhere, their constant yelling of CCP mantras is painful to see.
    Finally, most of the comments on here have turned into childish s--t-flinging and no one is taking either side seriously.

    Urgh.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 116.

    @Lata re:#77
    "How long will this hate against Chinese going to continue? It really makes me sick. All the news you read on BBC about China is more than 90% negative."

    so since according to you 90% of the bbc coverage about china is negative why do you keep hanging around here. if you do not like the bbc news you are free to leave this website and never come back. there are other sites i'm sure you will agree with over 90% of the time i suggest you stick to those and stop being so sensitive. it's called choice. sites like the bbc will not change and will always be there, get used to it

 

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