China arrests after kidney sold for iPad

 
A man tests out an iPad at an Apple shop in Shanghai, 28 February 2012 iPads are as sought-after in China as in many other countries

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Five people have been arrested in southern China after a teenager sold his kidney so he could buy an iPhone and iPad, state media have reported.

Those detained include the surgeon who removed the kidney from the boy in April last year.

State-run Xinhua news agency says the group received around $35,000 (£22,000) for the transplant.

The student is said to be suffering renal failure, according to prosecutors in Hunan province quoted by Xinhua.

Only identified by his surname Wang, he is said to have received about $3,000 for his kidney.

The 17-year-old was reportedly recruited for the illegal trade through an online chatroom.

Organ shortage

The case was discovered when his mother noticed the new gadgets; when asked where he got the money, he admitted selling a kidney.

The group behind the operation have been charged with causing intentional injury and illegal organ trading.

While Apple iPhones and iPads are very popular in China, they are priced beyond the reach of many urban workers.

And there is a constant shortage of organ donors.

Official figures from the health ministry show that about 1.5 million people need transplants, but only 10,000 are performed annually.

Executed prisoners have been often used as a source of organs, but last month China vowed to phase this out over the next five years.

 

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  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 84.

    Wang doesn’t match the surname given when the story broke last summer. Back then is was “Zheng,” & now kid’s being called “Wang.” All of the other info matches up, however – including the time frame, all the monetary amounts mentioned, the locations of the boy’s home as well as the hospital where the surgery took place. I'm assuming same kid, but why repeat story with changed name?

  • rate this
    -2

    Comment number 83.

    Definitely a Darwin award candidate there. Though you have to wonder if he sold both kidneys, if not then why the renal failure, 1 is usually enough to keep you going.
    As for those who encouraged/coerced him to do it, undoubtedly their organs will be harvested once they're executed for this.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 82.

    Yes, the surgeon and agents and the rest of them deserve our contempt. However, I still don't understand why very few people are also blaming this young man. At 17, he's surely old enough to know right from wrong? You're allowed to join the army in this country at the age of 16 and we all know what being a soldier means in the UK; it's a licence to die young.

  • rate this
    +15

    Comment number 81.

    This is what happens when consumerism & materialism are all our kids are aspire to.

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 80.

    Aren't so many problems in the world caused by trying to live beyond one's means? London's riots and Eurozone debt crisis are examples. We are constantly bombarded with marketing campaigns telling us what we lack when in fact we do not need those things at all. When will people learn to be grateful for roof over their heads and food on their tables?

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 79.

    Who encouraged this young man to sell his kidney for an ipod? What sort of corrupted surgeon committed this outrageous operation? The boy, Wang is from Anhui - one of the poorest Provinces in China. Interestingly, a nearly identical story surfaced LAST JUNE - surname "Zheng". Cases are so similar, they could be referring to same event, but why report same story twice, with name change?

  • rate this
    +15

    Comment number 78.

    It's the american way, oh how quickly the chinese learn. Eat your heart out Mr cameron but the UK is still a far way off adopting the US nightmare, no matter how much you admire!

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 77.

    There's a high chance that kidney came to the UK too. We are their biggest organ export market. UK people should look after their bodies better so there's no gain for Chinese authorities to execute prisoners to sell their livers to us.

  • rate this
    +4

    Comment number 76.

    This is a sad story of pure greed and exploitation of minors, but also of materialistic obsession from a young lad. I'm disgusted a surgeon could get involved in such illegal practice as they would know the long term consequences unlike the young man.
    When I was young my parents taught me you can't have everything in life and it really want something you must earn it yourself through hard work

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 75.

    26.Clive -Ridiculous. Typical of mentality of freedom without responsibility. Oh yes, do what you like and if it makes you money, so much the better. Following your logic then, presumably you're happy to pay for your own medical care whan things go wrong? Or do the rest of us have to foot your bill?

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 74.

    A fool at their money ar soon parted, now it seems that extends to organs..

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 73.

    ''While Apple iPhones and iPads are very popular in China, they are priced beyond the reach of many urban workers.''

    Same in the UK! An iphone would cost over 1/3rd of my monthly salary, an Ipad about half. Can't say I'll be selling my kidneys to get one anytime soon though.

  • rate this
    -2

    Comment number 72.

    .


    If we can terminate life (abortion) for the sake of convenience, why can't we sell a kidney for an iPad? Discuss!


    .

  • rate this
    +14

    Comment number 71.

    i think it is very sad and not really funny at all. yes, he made a mistake, but no one was there for him to tell him he is precious as a human being and that all the material things in the world don't even come close to what he is worth.

  • rate this
    -2

    Comment number 70.

    @65. evidence_over_argument
    'sell all my organs'...that's a terrible thing to say, if I did that I could die - so you must want me to die?? That's a bit much over a difference of opinion, is it not?

    Maybe the kid really wanted an ipad, like I say, he did well to get an iphone out of the bargain - he'll go far in life!

  • rate this
    +6

    Comment number 69.

    If we had to choose a news story to sum up the shortcomings of our time for future generations, wouldn't this one do pretty well?

  • rate this
    +4

    Comment number 68.

    Having lived in China for some years now, I have often said that when Deng Xiaopeng opened the Chinese economy to market and capitalist ideas, it sometimes took and used the very worst practices one sees: Chinese TV is riddled with the worst kind of USA advertisments intruding into programs; now kidney selling; and widespread cheating as caveat emptor writ large with few imposed checks available.

  • rate this
    +23

    Comment number 67.

    29.Hugh Mann "Sadly this is a reflection of people's desperation to achieve materially. Will this drive destroy our species?"

    I'd say the opposite, it should make us stronger through natural selection. Anyone daft enough to sell a kidney for an iPad hopefully won't get the chance to breed, improving the genepool for future generations.
    Now if only we could make the Daily Mail radioactive...

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 66.

    To me, this is all about happiness and the search for it. I see unhappy people all around me, and the poor souls are all trying to buy shiny things in order to find happiness. We seem to have evolved our global economic society to the point where it makes us sad...so we buy crap...to try to be happy...but we have to be sad...so we can have jobs making the crap... Sod this, I'm going for a walk.

  • Comment number 65.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

 

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