China to end organ donations from executed prisoners

 
File photo: China prison Most of the transplant organs in China come from prisoners on death row

China has pledged to end the practice of taking organs from executed prisoners within the next five years, state media report.

Officials say the country would instead rely on a new national donation system for organ transplants.

Prisoners account for two-thirds of China's transplant organs, according to previous estimates from state media.

Human rights groups say death row inmates are pressured to donate organs - China denies such allegations.

Correspondents say that China has long said it intends to reduce reliance on prisoners for organ donation, but the sheer volume of organs needed may make this difficult to achieve within the timeframe set out.

Official figures from the health ministry show that about 1.5 million people need transplants, but only 10,000 are performed annually, state-run agency Xinhua says.

Huang Jiefu, vice minister of health, was quoted by Xinhua as saying that a trial system for public organ donation has been launched in some areas.

"The pledge to abolish organ donations from condemned prisoners represents the resolve of the government," he said.

He added that organ donations from prisoners were not ideal because infections are usually high, affecting the long-term survival rates of those who undergo the transplants.

Rights groups estimate that China puts to death thousands of prisoners a year.

Official figures, however, remain a state secret, according to the BBC's Martin Patience in Beijing.

He adds that the country faces a severe shortage of organ donors, partly because many people do not want to donate organs due to the cultural belief of that they should be buried whole.

This has led to a thriving black market. Officials outlawed organ trafficking five years ago, but it still remains a problem.

The Red Cross Society of China has also said that guidelines would be issued regarding financial aid to families of the deceased organ donors to help curb the illegal organ trade.

 

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  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 45.

    I hope the recent, pompous trend of passing along your assigned Chinese PR stories is short lived. As if government even has a vague clue of the facts behind the Chinese iron curtain.
    Does Chinese gold shine just as brightly? Lovely.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 44.

    I see no reason to stop this practice. After all, they are dead anyway and they didn't do anything good with their lives while they were alive, at least they can do something good after they die.
    This practice would be a good thing in all countries that execute prisoners. I am definitely all for it and I am sorry that China wants to stop it

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 43.

    I don't see the problem.
    Executed prisoners wont need the organs anymore, so why is it so wrong to give the organs to the needy. what about their 'human rights'?

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 42.

    I am a great believer that evil is transmitted in genes. I certainly would not recommend anyone accepting an organ from a death row inmate.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 41.

    It is so terrible and I hope these bad situation will end as soon as possible .

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 40.

    28. Peter_Sym

    The problem with the current system of using prisoners’ organs is that a prisoner’s blood type has been found to influence if they get a death sentence.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 39.

    In any civilized society the body of the deceased, in it's entirety, belongs to the family or next of kin. The decision whether or not to donate organs should not be made by the state, the potential for abuse is simply too great, especially in a prison where the prisoner's lives are literally at the mercy of the government officals who run them.

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 38.

    I don't see why they shouldn't use condemned convicts for donor organs. Considering that criminal are a burden on society, at the very least they could help save lives after their death and in turn rectify themselves.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 37.

    What a macabre industry of harvesting poor humans being punished for petty economic and religious crimes to preserve the lives of the rich and unbelieving.

    The Human body is a temporal machine designed to carry a person through life as they prepare for the eternity of the human soul, to keep it alive at the expense of another person's life is an issue greater than a bad organ.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 36.

    Only the location of their ex-HMS Aircraft carrier 'paperweight' will change; Nothing else.
    Post-revolution Big brother says whatever he pleases.
    They accept it or die whilst slaving on your knocked-off Smart-slippers.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 35.

    China should allow those of us who so much admire the system to be able to have the organs of faithful members of the Communist party who die after deciding to give up politics.
    A red liver is resistant.

  • Comment number 34.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 33.

    Organ harvesting has been going on for years, is facilitated by the military, and the proceeds from which contribute heavily to China's defense budget. This report will tell you all that you need to know:

    http://organharvestinvestigation.net/

  • rate this
    -2

    Comment number 32.

    #28 You fail to grasp the flawed and dubious to say the least judicial system operating in China that sentences people to death and the crimes listed as warranting this sentence. And bear in mind that most transplants are sold off to wealthy overseas patients and not those 1.5 million Chinese in China who require transplants. Still think it is justifiable?

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 31.

    It is difficult to imagine a more disgusting practice than removing the organs from an executed person. If they do this then surely justice may well be skewed to ensure they get sufficient organs - by finding people conveniently 'guilty'.

    No one should underestimate the immorality of this practice. If you think it is right, just stop and think: It may be your son or daughter one day.

  • rate this
    -2

    Comment number 30.

    China has a huge population, so the guessed numbers of prisoner executions don't seem out of balance in a country with capital punishment, and that's their system. Prisoner populations are notoriously unhealthy everywhere, and therefore would not produce good donors. Pressuring prisoners to donate organs is untenable.

  • Comment number 29.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 28.

    I'm surprised I'm apparently the only one who doesn't have a massive problem with China taking organs from executed prisoners. Its still going to execute the prisoner... the only difference now is that one death isn't going to be balanced out by 5 or 6 lives saved.

  • rate this
    -2

    Comment number 27.

    I don't know about you but I get this feeling that we are living a life of science fiction and hopefully we will wake and realize it was just a bad dream/episode of the 'Twilight Zone.'

  • rate this
    -2

    Comment number 26.

    @U14761436
    hahahahahahahahahahahaha
    good stuff
    very funny!!!!

 

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