Chinese authorities agree to review Ai Weiwei tax case

Chinese artist Ai Weiwei, photographed in November 2010 Chinese authorities will take two months to review Ai Weiwei's tax evasion case

Related Stories

Authorities in China have agreed to Ai Weiwei's request to review a $2.4m (£1.55m) fine imposed by the tax bureau for ''back taxes''.

The outspoken artist was charged with tax evasion linked to his Fake Cultural Development Ltd company in November.

He paid a $1.3m bond required by law for an appeal and his lawyers filed a 9,000-word request last week.

He said officials told him over the phone on Wednesday that the review would be completed in two months.

He was able to pay the bond after some 30,000 supporters sent money to him.

Mr Ai says that the allegations against him are a bid by the authorities to silence his criticism of the government.

The world-renowned artist was arrested in April 2011 and detained for 81 days, his whereabouts unknown.

He was given a gag order when released in June, but continued to tweet and speak to international media. He was then charged with tax evasion.

The artist was named by ArtReview magazine last year as the most powerful artist in the world.

"We hope that the tax bureau will earnestly review the case," Mr Ai's lawyer, Pu Zhiqiang, told AFP.

"If we are not satisfied with the results, we can bring the case to court," he added.

More on This Story

Related Stories

More China stories

RSS

Features

  • Nigel Farage (left) and Douglas CarswellWho's next?

    The Tory MPs being tipped to follow Carswell to UKIP


  • A painting of the White House on fire by Tom FreemanFinders keepers

    The odd objects looted by the British from Washington in 1814


  • Sailing rock in Death ValleyRock and roll

    Mystery of Death Valley's 'sliding rocks' solved - and more tales


  • Chris and Regina Catrambone with their daughter Maria LuisaSOS

    The millionaires who rescue people at sea


  • Plane7 days quiz

    What unusual offence got a Frenchman thrown off a plane?


BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.