Asia

Second Korean family reunion in North

  • 24 October 2015
  • From the section Asia
South Korean Gu Sang-yeon, 98 (L) meets his North Korean daughters Ku Song-ok (C) and Ku Sun-ok (R) during the family reunion after being separated for 60 years (24 October 2015) Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Gu Sang-yeon, 98, travelled from South Korea to meet his daughters for the first time in over 60 years

A group of mainly elderly South Koreans have met relatives in the North, in the second of two organised reunions for family members separated by the 1950-53 Korean War.

About 250 people have been allowed to travel from the south for three days of meetings at Mount Kumgang resort.

Another group attended reunions earlier this week.

For most of those attending it is the first time that they have had any contact in over 60 years.

Millions of people ended up separated from loved ones by the physical division of the Korean peninsula.

The reunions taking place this week are only the second round in the past five years.

One of those travelling to the resort was the mother of a man who South Korea said was abducted by the North in 1972.

The South Koreans were chosen using a computerised lottery system from among thousands who applied.

Often accompanied by family members, they travelled in a convoy of buses from South Korea to meet their relatives.

Given their age and the infrequent nature of these reunions, they are unlikely to ever see each other again.

Image copyright Reuters
Image caption Jung Kun-mok - who South Korea says was abducted by the North - met his mother Lee Bok-sun
Image copyright AFP
Image caption North Korean Han Eum-jeon met her husband Jeon Gyu-myeong - both are in their 80s
Image copyright AFP
Image caption Many of the elderly participants were meeting siblings for the first time in decades - such as sisters Cho Soon-jeon and Gwi-nyeo
Image copyright EPA
Image caption It was an emotional reunion for brother and sister Han Chal-gill and Han Won-ja
Image copyright AFP
Image caption Sisters Ro Yeong-hwa and Noh Yeong-nyeo, now 88 and 93, found themselves on different sides of the border
Image copyright AP
Image caption South Korean mother Kom Wol-soon, 93, wept as she was reunited with her 72-year-old North Korean son Ju Jae-un

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