Elephants killed by speeding train in India

Elephant hit by train, 30 May The train rammed into the elephants in northern West Bengal

Related Stories

Three elephants have been killed by a train in the Indian state of West Bengal.

One more elephant is reported to be seriously injured.

The express train hit the animals near Marghat forest, 385 miles (620km) north of the state capital Calcutta, forest minister Hiten Barman said.

Activists have called for trains to lower their speed through such areas following the death of dozens of elephants in recent years.

"The train knocked down the elephants due to negligence of the driver," Mr Barman told AFP news agency.

But railway spokesman Jayant Sharma told AP news agency that the accident site had occurred outside the state's elephant corridor.

There had been no warning from the forest department about the movement of the elephants, he added.

"Train accidents of this sort have of late become a concern in the northern districts of West Bengal," Mr Barman said.

Official figures show at least 42 elephants had been killed in West Bengal since 2004, he added.

India is home to around 25,000 elephants. Their numbers are dwindling due to poaching and the destruction of their habitats by humans.

More on This Story

Related Stories

More Asia stories

RSS

Features

  • Alana Saarinen at pianoMum, Dad and Mum

    The girl with three biological parents


  • Polish and British flags alongside British roadsideWar debt

    Does the UK still feel a sense of obligation towards Poles?


  • Islamic State fighters parade in Raqqa, Syria (30 June 2014)Who backs IS?

    Where Islamic State finds support to become a formidable force


  • Bride and groom-to-be photographed underwaterWetted bliss

    Chinese couples told to smile, but please hold your breath


  • A ship is dismantled for scrap in the port city of Chittagong, BangladeshDangerous work

    Bangladesh's ship breakers face economic challenge


BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.