NZ cricketer Jesse Ryder 'has no memory of attack'

Jesse Ryder in March 2001 Jesse Ryder had been due to join the Indian Premier League

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New Zealand cricketer Jesse Ryder has told police that he has no recollection of being attacked outside a bar.

Ryder, 28, was put in a medically-induced coma after being attacked twice in quick succession as he left the bar in Christchurch last Thursday.

He is now out of the coma and intensive care, but has been unable to help police with their investigation.

Ryder told police his last memory was being dismissed in a match on Wednesday.

Two people have been charged with assault and are due in court later this week.

"Unfortunately Mr Ryder has no recollection of what took place or the events leading up to the incident," Detective Senior Sergeant Brian Archer said.

"Should Mr Ryder gain sufficient recollection as his recovery continues, then we may look to speak to him again. However there are no immediate plans to re-interview him at this time."

The cricketer had been in Christchurch with team-mates after playing for Wellington Firebirds in a domestic one-day competition. He had been due to fly to Delhi to begin a $300,000 (£200,000) contract in the Indian Premier League.

His manager, Aaron Klee, said it was not known when his client would be discharged from hospital.

"He's absolutely talking, sitting there having conversations and he's up on his feet," Mr Klee said. "It's nice to see the big guy back on his feet again."

Ryder stopped playing international cricket for New Zealand in February last year after a series of alcohol-related problems. He had also had disciplinary lapses.

But police said while he had been drinking before the assault on Thursday morning, alcohol was not a factor.

The suspects charged with assaulting him, aged 20 and 37, are due to appear before Christchurch District Court on 4 April.

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