Indian general who led Golden Temple raid stabbed in London

An activist from a radical Sikh organization holds a poster showing the 1984 damage of the Sri Akal Takht at the Golden Temple in Amritsar on June 6, 2009. While Lt-Gen Brar is thought to still be a target for Sikh extremists, there is no evidence they are behind this attack

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The Indian general who led a 1984 raid on Sikh militants in Amritsar's Golden Temple has been stabbed in London.

Lt-General Kuldeep Singh Brar sustained serious but not life-threatening injuries when four men attacked him.

The 78-year-old is thought to still be a target for extremist Sikhs, but there has been no suggestion yet as to the identity of his attackers.

Lt Gen Brar's Operation Bluestar left around 1,000 people dead.

The army raided the Golden Temple in the Sikh holy city of Amritsar in June 1984 to flush out armed Sikh militants who were fighting for an independent homeland of Khalistan.

Reports on the exact number of people killed vary but it is thought about 1,000 people were killed in the ensuing struggle, including women and children on pilgrimage and soldiers.

Lt Gen Kuldeep Singh Brar was one of the key architects of the operation.

He was attacked on Old Quebec Street in the Oxford Circus area of London on Sunday night by unknown assailants.

After spending the night in hospital he was released on Monday.

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