Africa

Nigeria violence: 'Boko Haram' destroy village

  • 22 May 2014
  • From the section Africa
The ruins of Gamboru Ngala's market, Nigeria
Many towns and villages have been razed to the ground in the north-east

Suspected militant Islamists have killed more than 25 people in an attack on a village in north-eastern Nigeria, residents say.

The gunmen burnt nearly all the homes in Chikongudo, and stole food in Wednesday night's attack, they said.

This came a day after a double bombing killed 122 in the central city of Jos.

The Boko Haram group is suspected to have carried out the attacks, as it intensifies its insurgency to create an Islamic state in Nigeria.

Chikongudo is near the town of Gamboru Ngala, where more than 300 residents were killed in an attack earlier this month.

Two other villages were raided this week in north-east Nigeria, killing 27 people.

Teachers across Nigeria protested on Thursday calling for better security at schools
The government is under pressure to secure the release of schoolgirls abducted last month
Two bombs exploded in Jos city on Tuesday, killing 122 people

Last month, Boko Haram abducted more than 200 schoolgirls from Chibok town, also in the north-eastern state of Borno.

Residents of the town have said a mother of one of the abducted girls has died after developing high blood pressure following the abductions.

'Scared to teach'

Residents of Chikongudo, who spoke to BBC Hausa on condition of anonymity, said soldiers had been deployed in the village, but they left about 10 days ago.

The gunmen stormed the village in cars and motorbikes, a trademark of Boko Haram, said the residents.

Some villagers managed to flee to Gamboru Ngala as the attackers advanced on the village, they added.

One resident said only three homes remained in the village, and the rest had been razed to the ground.

People had no food and had lost all their belongings, he added.

In the capital, Abuja, about 1,000 people have been marching to the presidential villa to protest at the government's failure to secure the release of the schoolgirls.

Police in riot gear and fire engines with water cannon were stationed outside the villa, the Associated Press news agency reports.

The security forces have been widely criticised for failing to prevent attacks by Boko Haram, despite the declaration of a state of emergency in the three north-eastern states worst affected by the insurgency - Borno, Adamawa and Yobe.

Teachers across Nigeria also held a day of protests on Thursday in support of the abducted schoolgirls.

Teaching unions said they were also marching in memory of the 173 teachers killed by militants and called on government to increase protection for schools, which were closed for the day.

A union leader, Segun Raheem, said many teachers were scared of being attacked by Boko Haram.

"They don't even sleep at home. And when they go to school, it is with shock," he told the BBC's Newsday programme.

US President Barack Obama on Wednesday said he had deployed 80 military personnel to neighbouring Chad to help in the search for the girls.

A UK spy plane sent to help look for the girls has arrived in Ghana, after it broke down and was forced to land in Senegal.

The girls are thought to be held in a remote forested area in Borno, close to the border with Chad and Cameroon.

Nigeria under attack

  • 20 May: Twin bomb attacks killed at least 118 people in the central city of Jos
  • 18 May: Suicide blast on a busy street in northern city of Kano kills four, including a 12-year-old girl
  • 5 May: Boko Haram militants slaughter more than 300 residents in the town of Gamboru Ngala
  • 2 May: Car bomb claims at least 19 lives in the Nigerian capital, Abuja
  • 14 April: Twin bomb attack claimed by Boko Haram kills more than 70 at an Abuja bus station; the same day, the group abducts more than 200 schoolgirls from the remote northern town of Chibok

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