Libya assembly elects Mustafa Abu Shagur as prime minister

Libyan deputy premier Mustafa Abu Shagur during a news conference in Tripoli on March 7, 2012 Mr Shagur spent many years in the US before returning to Libya last year

Members of Libya's national assembly have elected Deputy Prime Minister Mustafa Abu Shagur as the country's next prime minister.

In a run-off vote he narrowly beat Mahmoud Jibril - who served as interim PM following the uprising against Col Muammar Gaddafi last year.

Mr Shagur is a respected optical engineer with a long history of opposition to Col Gaddafi.

He has pledged to make security a priority during his 18-month tenure.

Mr Jibril comfortably won the first round of the vote, with 86 to 55 votes. But in the run-off, Mr Shagur won 96 votes, two more than Mr Jibril.

Mr Shagur's victory was in part due to the support of deputies from the Muslim Brotherhoods' Justice and Construction Party, AFP news agency says.

The election came a day after the killing of the US ambassador to Libya, and three others, in an attack on the consulate in the country's second city, Benghazi.

Mr Shagur studied at the University of Tripoli before moving to the US, where he earned a PhD and worked as an academic and optical engineer.

He returned in 2011 to become an adviser to the National Transitional Council, which was formed during the revolt that ousted Gaddafi.

Last November, he was appointed deputy to Prime Minister Abdurrahim al-Keib.

The 200-member national assembly was elected in July, in the first free polls in decades.

More on This Story

More Africa stories

RSS

Features

  • The OfficeIn pictures

    Fifty landmark shows from 50 years of BBC Two


  • French luxury Tea House, Mariage Freres display of tea pots Tea for tu

    France falls back in love with tea - but don't expect a British cuppa


  • Worcestershire flagFlying the flag

    Preserving the identities of England's counties


  • Female model's bottom in leopard skin trousers as she walks up the catwalkBum deal

    Why budget buttock ops can be bad for your health


  • Two women in  JohanesburgYour pictures

    Readers' photos on the theme of South Africa


BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.