African viewpoint: Death on the continent

 
South African miners killed by police Last week 34 people were shot dead by police in a South African mine

In our series of viewpoints from African journalists, film-maker and columnist Farai Sevenzo reflects on the recent deaths of three African leaders, miners in South Africa and prisoners in The Gambia.

2012 may well be remembered as the year in which three African presidents died in office. Malawi, Ghana and Ethiopia were leaderless briefly but the dead were calmly replaced and everything moved on as normally as we could have hoped for when deputies took over the ships of state and uncertainty was extinguished.

There was no mystical sign, despite some preachers claiming that they had prophesied a death or two. The three men simply fell ill and sickness silenced their voices forever.

Ethiopia's Meles Zenawi's Twitter feed had fallen silent way back in May, and so rumours of his illness had seeped from his hospital in Brussels and back to Addis Ababa so that the people knew some ill wind would bring the news down eventually and a sense of preparedness had been in the offing.

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Since it may be bad manners and bad luck to say that 2012 has a few more months to go and we may lose a few more leaders to untimely death, I shall not entertain that thought”

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Since it may be bad manners and bad luck to say that 2012 has a few more months to go and we may lose a few more leaders to untimely death, I shall not entertain that thought.

Presidents in their passing this year have seemed to unite their respective countries like never before. Think of the amazing scene of Ethiopians coming together in Addis the other night, a sea of candles reflecting on their leaders' passing in Meskel Square and beyond.

Or of the unity of the Ghanaians as John Atta Mills dropped his baton - a death greeted with dignity by chiefs and villagers, heads of state and street children.

These untimely ends should of course strengthen the argument that it may not be too wise in the Africa of tomorrow to have leaders who are constantly fighting with their birthdays and the states of their health.

Even as Angola goes to the polls later this week, President Jose Eduardo Dos Santos will have reached 70 and still going, as if there can never be an alternative.

Over in Zimbabwe a constitutional draft had suggested that the presidential term should be limited to 10 years and that executive power should be distributed within a cabinet. Eighty-eight-year-old President Robert Mugabe has rejected such a suggestion in the proposed new constitution and elections are a year away.

Young and wise?

Of course it may well be the case that there is no alternative to the old and infirm running nations in which the average age keeps falling to the 20s and lower, but it is a debate that will not go away.

Yahya Jammeh Yahya Jammeh says he wants to execute all the convicts on death row in September

It would be wrong too to talk only of the powerful that die or may not be with us for long without remembering the weak that have been claimed by famine, war and the actions of the police.

Striking South African platinum miners were the focus of a memorial service in Marikana in scenes raw with grief and underlined the truth about these African lives that, while they may have been taken cheaply, they mattered.

And then there is The Gambia. Here we have a head of state in Yahya Jammeh who is still only in his 40s and seems as far away from death's grasp as any young person imagines himself to be.

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If the executions continue these will be 47 lives cheaply taken by a paranoid president who imagines that his own life is worth a great deal more than those whose killings he has ordered”

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When Mr Jammeh will die is a fact known only to his maker, and it is certain that when he does die some will mourn him with the same depth of feeling that other citizens in other countries have mourned their leaders.

But Mr Jammeh shocked us all the other day by announcing that he would celebrate Eid by executing up to 47 people, many of them charged with treason, currently on death row in The Gambia's prisons.

Amnesty International now says all 47 people had been moved to one place and last Thursday night nine people, including one woman, became the first executed in the West African country since 1985. It is, according to the human rights group, "a giant leap backwards".

The African Union asked the youngish president to renounce his plans after hearing him say in a televised speech: "By the middle of next month, all the death sentences would have been carried out to the letter".

However, nine executed people have been his answer to the AU.

Of course, if the executions continue, these will be 47 lives cheaply taken by a paranoid president who imagines that his own life is worth a great deal more than those whose killings he has ordered.

If you would like to comment on Farai Sevenzo's latest column, please use the form below.

 

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  • rate this
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    Comment number 21.

    TO START WITH, THOSE DEAD MINERS (RIP) AND THE REST OF YOU LUCKY TO BE ALIFE TODAY WHERE WRONG TO HAVE TOOK UP HARMS IN WHAT SHOULD HAVE BEEN A PEACEFUL PROTEST. BUT...
    THE REAL CULPRIT HERE ARE THE POLICE, THE PROSECUTORS, AND THE SO CALLED JUDICIAL SYSTEM THAT IS GOING TO ALLOW SUCH A LOW CLASS FRAME UP.

  • rate this
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    Comment number 20.

    @3.BluesBerry "Trials are unfair in Gambia. Death sentences are often used as a tool against political opposition."
    Why the executions are controversial, I don't think they are political. The US executes more prisoners per year than all of Africa. I don't they the electric chairs and lethal injections are politically motivated. Amnesty is still trying to rebalance post cold ward, post-9/11

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 19.

    Imaging killing your fist wife b cos of d second one, killing your husband by pouring hot cooking oil on him b cos he plan to marry anoda wife, killing your biological Mum, stabbing one on the head causing her death and being ex Gambian soldiers and trained by Kukoi sanyang (lead the 81 coup) in Libya as mercenaries, attacked a Gambian barrack, killing 2 soldiers and abduction 1. WHY BLAME JAMMEH?

  • rate this
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    Comment number 18.

    All inmates executed in The Gambia killed some one,s Father, Mother, Son Or uncle, there is none among that have not taken an innocent life. What is the big deal here? The lives they have taken are u telling the world that they are not worthless. God will punish us all if we should we are to distinguish worthy and worthless lives.

  • rate this
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    Comment number 17.

    south Africans are quick to forget there woeful past. Because the elders forget to remind the young ones about the apartheid agony they experienced in the past and now it turnout to hunt them in someway.

  • rate this
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    Comment number 16.

    9. Bekuretsion Fesshaye - the miners were not unarmed. Read the reports and you will see that they struck first.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 15.

    Why should people be crucifying Jammeh? Am not saying he is a saint nor am I saying no one fears him. Few questions to clarify, Is he acting on his own will or the power invested on him by the law? Why is it no one stand against it when the law was re-instated (locals and outsiders...AU, ECOWAS etc)? Remember an eye for an eye is not but a fair judgement, though its better to forgive.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 14.

    Re 13: I knew that somewhere along the line, the evil white devils would have to be blamed for the massacre or the miners.

    Clearly, your anti-white racism prevents you seeing the truth of the matter. The brutality and barbarism of the ANC has now reached the mining industry. What next? some burning tyres hung around teenagers necks? Thats the tradition isn't it?

    It should all have been better.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 13.

    Over 100 years the west has taken care of Africa and this is where she is at.

    At least they are learning the bad ways of the west, if nothing else.

  • rate this
    -2

    Comment number 12.

    The SA miners were asking for a fair living wage. They earn on average USD 500 per month.

    Australian miners earn USD 2000 per shift. They do exactly the same kind of work as their South African counterparts.

    How can this be? Does Australian ore fetch a higher price than SA ore?

    It seems profits made in Africa are used by Western companies to subsidise wages of Western workers.

    This must stop.

  • rate this
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    Comment number 11.

    ...CLOSE THE MINE AND GIVE THE LAND TO THE OWNERS OF THE LAND…the Europeans and few ANC puppets leaders who own the mine can get another mine outside Africa…

  • rate this
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    Comment number 10.

    Roads, hospitals, schools, and electricity can never substitute civil rights and the rule of law in any country. This is an attempt by Yaha Jammeh to terrorize Gambians to submit to his rule. Unfortunately it will have the opposite effect.

    I urge the international community to place travel bans on Jammeh, his family and all his cabinet ministers so that they can respect the rights of Gambians.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 9.

    What happened in South Africa is a massacre of unarmed striking workers. Democracy is on hot water. The three presidents died from stress and over work running a nation without time limit. In the past they were killed in a palace coup. The Gambian president looks and behaves like Idi Amin Dad.The United nations should intervene.

  • rate this
    -2

    Comment number 8.

    The western world is so quick to forget what is going on in Vladimir Putin's Russia. How many people have been killed in the crack down on protesters? What about the Israel situation? Really the focus should not be on African leaders but on all bad leaders regardless of their origin.

  • rate this
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    Comment number 7.

    Another 'African strongman' Power corrupts; absolute power corrupts absolutely. Power drunk goons terrorise their people as ECOWAS, Common Wealth etc wait until attrocities are commited before acting. ECOWAS must sign a treaty authorising the use of force to remove anyone who siezes power & does not allow free/fair elections. Enough of this nonsense.

  • rate this
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    Comment number 6.

    Yaya Jammeh i does what ever he feel like but one thing is God will not come down to remove this guy for us as He gave us the brain to get organized and deal with it , We the Gambian should stop asking God for help as he will not answer to us without being making effort of what we begging him for we need to form a united front to unseat this heartless dictator Enough is enough.

  • rate this
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    Comment number 5.

    unfortunatelly some of these African leaders are behaving like Kings or Gangasters. http://mycontinent.co/African-Gangsters.php

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 4.

    I have always held the opinion that societies get the leaders they deserve & the best way to keep ruling a person is to make him believe he is inferior.

    Until the African populace begin to realise that ultimate power resides in them, there will always be power drunk lunatics who believe that they are wiser than anybody else and use state institutions especially the military against opponents.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 3.

    Trials are unfair in Gambia. Death sentences are often used as a tool against political opposition. Given Gambia Govt uses death penalty (& other harsh sentences) as tool to silence political dissent, any execution is a further indicator of the brutality with which President Jammeh’s regime is bent on crushing opposition.
    Conversely, I believe this will increase opposition.

  • rate this
    +4

    Comment number 2.

    People in Africa kill because they've been told to: told by god, or the devil, or their leader, or their ancestors. Or just because they want your cell phone. And they have muti that means they themselves will not be killed. Until all religion and superstition is banned, and a new generation of rationalists grows up, the blood will continue to flow. God, greed, and ignorance: Africa's problems.

 

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