A different take on Africa's year ahead...

 
A handout picture taken on 4 January 2012 and released on 11 January 2012 by the African Cup of Nations 2012 press office Andrew predicts Guinea will win the Africa Cup of Nations - do you agree?

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This year, no tea-leaves, no "muti" or traditional medicine, no entrails or astrology and none of the usual stuff about elections, wars and dying politicians.

Instead, my predictions for 2012 deal with more every-day matters. Sorry they are a bit late, but if you like them, or hate them, or have infinitely better suggestions - please write in, and we can get together again in 2013 to compare notes.

Incidentally, how do you think my sangoma's forecasts for 2011 came out?

So, in 2012....

  • A consortium of well-connected Angolans will purchase Portugal's Benfica football club
  • The phrase "African middle class" will appear in more international headlines than "famine"
  • Guinea will win the Africa Cup of Nations (they are my pick in the office sweepstake)
  • An international chain will open a store in Somalia's capital, Mogadishu. For several weeks
  • The number of Chinese language schools in Nigeria will quadruple
  • The number of Africans living below the "poverty line" will drop from 61% to 57%, but almost nobody will report the fact
  • Someone will coin a new name for Africa's middle class - which will be 400-million strong by the end of the year. The phrase will come from Mandarin
  • A catchy song about malarial bed-nets will become an unexpected hit in Zambia, and a star of South Africa's undervalued poetry scene will be sampled by US rapper Jay-Z
  • An unemployed Spanish woman, seeking work in Mozambique's capital Maputo, will be disqualified from winning a local beauty pageant
  • Zimbabweans will stop accepting the euro as currency
  • The continent will win more medals at the Olympics than ever before but four African athletes will get lost on the London underground system and miss their heats.
 
Andrew Harding, Africa correspondent Article written by Andrew Harding Andrew Harding Africa correspondent

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  • rate this
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    Comment number 1.

    Last years predictions came during 2 revealing, smoke-and-chant-filled hours in the company of one of Soweto's most reliable sangomas. I found them so-so because I really had to work to find what might be the realization of some very "African" predictions.

  • rate this
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    Comment number 2.

    Following recent sucessful public protest against fuel subsidy removal by the Nigerian masses, I predict the government will begin taking serious steps to solving the electricity problem. Reliable and steady supply of electricity is a vital infrastructure in today's modern society on which other economic developments,quality of living are dependent. Perhaps, this is more of a wish than prediction.

  • rate this
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    Comment number 3.

    Consortium of well-connected Angolans purchase Portugal's Benfica football club. For 500 years, Angola was Portugal's biggest & richest African colony, So I can foresee the politics in this one.
    Phrase "African middle class" will appear in more international headlines than "famine". Don't think so unless upper & middle class does some really good stuff to reduce famine.

  • rate this
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    Comment number 4.

    Guinea will win the Africa Cup of Nations (your pick in office sweep-stake) Equatorial Guinea will share $1M win bonus & earn $20,000/goal against Libya when the co-host makes its debut at the African Cup of Nations. Cash has been put up by Teodoro Nguema Obiang Mangue, the son of the country's president. Even so, Guinea will fail.

  • rate this
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    Comment number 5.

    An international chain will open a store in Somalia's capital, Mogadishu. Can't see this with all the bombing & killing unless you're talking about an expansion of Jennie-O Turkey Store, where 400 to 600 Somali are employed (I think in Wilmar, Minnesota.)
    The number of Chinese language schools in Nigeria will quadruple. This is logical with Chinese investment in infrastructure.

 

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