Africa

Libya rebel leader sacks 'cabinet' over Younes death

  • 8 August 2011
  • From the section Africa
Libyan rebel leader Mustafa Abdel Jalil in Benghazi (file image)
Reports said Mustafa Abdel Jalil could re-appoint some of his ministers

The leader of Libya's rebel movement, Mustafa Abdel Jalil, has dismissed his entire executive committee, which functions as a cabinet.

This came in response to the killing of the rebel military chief Abdel Fattah Younes last month, a spokesman said.

Some among the rebels have blamed an allied Islamist faction for his death.

Abdel-Hafiz Ghoga told al-Jazeera there had been "shortcomings" in the way some members of the National Transitional Council had handled the matter.

The Associated Press quoted NTC member Fathi Turbel as saying it was clear the re-shuffle was needed after the "military, security and media incompetence" in the wake of Gen Younes' death.

Spokesman Shamsiddin Abdulmolah told Reuters the re-shuffle was a sign of "the maturing of the revolution, holding people responsible".

"It's healthy. The NTC is still the highest authority," he said.

Prime Minister Mahmoud Jibril has now been asked to form a new cabinet. Council members said some of the ministers could be re-appointed.

Gen Younes had defected to the rebels in February after serving in the Libyan leadership since the 1969 coup which brought Col Muammar Gaddafi to power.

His burnt body - along with two of his aides - was found on the outskirts of Benghazi on 28 July, after he had been recalled to give evidence on the ongoing conflict against Col Gaddafi.

The circumstances surrounding his death remain unknown, but it is known that Ali Essawy - a senior member of the NTC - had signed a warrant for this arrest.

Members of his tribe have demanded a full investigation into his death.

Some of his supporters have said he was assassinated by the Obaida Ibn Jarrah Brigade, an Islamist militia allied to the NTC, while other rebels have blamed the Gaddafi regime.

The killing has led to growing division within the rebel leadership and concerns among its domestic and international supporters that even if they defeat Col Gaddafi, they might not be ready to lead the country.