Happy new year? The world's getting slowly more cheerful

 

As 2013 draws to a close, pollsters have been finding out how people across the world feel about the state of their lives and the coming 12 months. Here, the BBC's world affairs correspondent, Paul Adams, analyses the findings.

Is the world getting better? Since 1977, opinion pollster Win/Gallup International has been asking this question of people around the world. Do responses for 2013 paint an optimistic picture?

Poll figures: Will next year be better than this year?

There has been no big change this year, and the global figure is down from highs in 2004-5, but the upward trend since polling began in 1977 is pretty clear. Almost 50% say 2014 will be better than 2013. You have to go back to 1990 for the last time more people predicted a worse year than a better one.

Dr Ijaz Gilani, vice-president of Win/Gallup International, says a global decline in the role of the state has gradually empowered the ordinary citizen.

What about that dip after 2005? Rising commodity prices in the middle of the last decade put a huge dent in global optimism before the effects of the financial collapse of 2008 began to ripple out across the world. Remember, 85% of the world's population lives outside North America and Europe.

One other thing: feeling good about 2014 isn't necessarily the same as thinking it will bring economic prosperity: across the world, 32% think it will. And 30% think it won't, according to Win/Gallup.

line break

This year, first the first time, Win/Gallup agreed to include three questions submitted by listeners to Radio 4's Today programme. They offer some interesting headlines.

Poll figures: Where would people choose to live

Home is where the heart is? A healthy plurality of people would prefer to stay put, but for those seeking sanctuary or opportunity abroad, Australia and Canada are now almost as desirable as the United States.

The American Dream is alive but less compelling. Washington's heated immigration debate has perhaps begun to convey an impression that the world's "huddled masses" are not as welcome as they once were. In the Middle East and North Africa, where post-Arab Spring turbulence creates high levels of political uncertainty, a surprisingly high number of people don't want to move. Among those who do, Saudi Arabia is more appealing than America.

People who are happy where they are (%)

Figures broken down by region

World average

Americas

W Europe

E Europe

Asia

Middle East, N Africa

Africa

38%

46%

38%

32%

36%

47%

44%

line break
Poll figures: Which country is the biggest threat to peace?

More bad, but not entirely surprising, news for the US. The world's sometimes eager, sometimes reluctant policeman is the subject of widespread animosity. Predictable in some areas (the Middle East and North Africa) but less so in others. Eastern Europe's 32% figure may be heavily influenced by Russia and Ukraine, but across most of Western Europe there are also lots of figures in the high teens.

In the Americas themselves, decades of US meddling have left an awkward legacy. Its neighbours, Mexico (37%) and Canada (17%), clearly have issues. Even 13% of Americans see their own country as a danger. Pakistan's unenviable position as a (distant) second in the global threat stakes probably has a regional explanation - 15% of the world's population lives in its neighbour and arch-rival, India.

line break
Poll figures: Would women leaders make a difference?

Almost 50% of those polled said it would make no difference or preferred not to answer. It's a question that makes people hesitate. In most Muslim-majority countries, scepticism that women would do a better job is high.

Thailand, which currently has a woman as prime minister, Japan and Kenya are also bastions of doubt. But Colombia leads a number of South American countries in thinking women might make the world a better place.

In war-torn, conservative Afghanistan, those in favour have a slender, surprising edge over those against. And in male-dominated China, there's a clear desire for change.

More women leaders would make things worse (%)

Figures broken down by region

World average

Americas

W Europe

E Europe

Asia

Middle East, N Africa

Africa

17%

8%

8%

18%

19%

34%

30%

Win/Gallup interviewed 67,806 people in total, in 65 countries either face-to-face, by telephone on online, between September and December 2013. The margin or error is +/- 3.5%. The global average was calculated according to the share of the covered adult population of the surveyed countries.

 

More on This Story

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

Comments

This entry is now closed for comments

Jump to comments pagination
 
  • rate this
    +75

    Comment number 18.

    Stay away from all forms of media (TV, newspaper, radio,internet) whose job is to scaremonger, inject fear so that they can control the populous.

    Knuckle down, get on with your own life and have loving relationships.

    Stay away from the drama and negativity.

    Wishing you all a happy 2014 and beyond. x

  • rate this
    +53

    Comment number 42.

    In the 70s - when we had all the power cuts - my Dad had a job near home, worked hard but not too hard, had job security, and could keep a wife and 3 very hungry kids and save up a bit after paying the mortgage.
    I went to Uni and came out with a debt that I paid off in a few months.
    I cant see any of the kids of my generation having any of that - I hope they are happy but it wont be easy

  • rate this
    +50

    Comment number 45.

    In 2014 the GDP of the UK will continue to grow and the results of any growth will continue to accrue to the top 5% whom the government represents. The rest of us will be no better off and probably see our standard of living be further eroded.

  • rate this
    +50

    Comment number 36.

    BBC the only things that seemed to have improved are MP's salaries, bankers bonuses and the efficiency of our food banks. Tell it like it is.

  • rate this
    +39

    Comment number 67.

    In 2014 we can look forward to more of the same. The population being fleeced by the banks, the petrol companies, the rail networks, the energy companies and the politicians (expenses and wages) - apologies to those I haven't included but invariably exist.

 

Comments 5 of 414

 

More World stories

RSS

Features

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.