Samoa Air boss defends charging passengers by weight

 
Aeroplane seat Air Samoa said the policy meant some people would end up paying less to fly

The head of Samoa Air has defended the airline's decision to start charging passengers according to their weight.

Chris Langton told Australia's ABC Radio that it was "the fairest way of travelling".

Rather than pay for a seat, passengers pay a fixed price per kilogram, which varies depending on the route length.

Samoa Air flies domestically and to American Samoa. It is thought the move could encourage other airlines to introduce similar policies.

"Airlines don't run on seats, they run on weight, and particularly the smaller the aircraft you are in the less variance you can accept in terms of the difference in weight between passengers," Mr Langton told ABC radio.

Start Quote

People generally are bigger, wider and taller than they were 50 years ago”

End Quote Chris Langton Samoa Air boss

"Anyone who travels at times has felt they have been paying for half of the passenger next to them."

Under the new model, Mr Langton described how some families with children were now paying cheaper fares.

"There are no extra fees in terms of excess baggage or anything - it is just a kilo is a kilo is a kilo," he said.

Air Samoa's rates range from $1 (65p) to around $4.16 per kilogram. Passengers pay for the combined weight of themselves and their baggage.

Mr Langton also suggested that the move had helped promote health awareness in Samoa, which has one of the world's highest levels of obesity.

"People generally are becoming much more weight conscious. That's a health issue in some areas," he told ABC Radio.

Mr Langton said he believed that charging by weight was "the concept of the future."

"People generally are bigger, wider and taller than they were 50 years ago," he said. "The industry will start looking at this."

 

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  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 124.

    I'm not sure about this. As a man who likes to work out, I'm going to weigh a lot more than a woman who doesn't. Men are likely to pay more than women for their seats, and those of us who have a bit of muscle on our frame will suffer too. But then I can appreciate that sitting next to/underneath an obese person on a flight isn't pleasant either.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 123.

    Having just returned from visiting family abroad, I am appalled at the amount of cabin baggage which is allowed by the airlines. I did comment 2 years ago to a stewardess on a Qantas flight and she said there is nothing they can do about it. If peoples' sizes are going to be weighed then this will do much to get people to diet I bet!

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 122.

    It sounds common-sense considering baggage is already charged that way as well but I am concerned that this line of thinking will expand into all other areas of our lives and hijacked by Insurance Companies & Corporations to maximise profit.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 121.

    Whether overweight, underweight, fat, slim, tall, short or whatever - the point is we pay for what we use. All this noise about "I'm tall!" or "I'm not fat but I weigh lots!" won't matter; whether you are more muscle or fat, as Mr Langton said "a kilo is a kilo is a kilo." Just think of all the luggage people will stop hauling around airports thoughtlessly tripping up others, to offset allowance.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 120.

    ABOUT TIME

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 119.

    Samoans are already known for having many larger sized citizens so it does makes sense there and probably easy to implement. But for passengers flying in/from/to the US (and most world) it will surely take 10 years of fighting in courts before this becomes mainstream or fully banned !!

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 118.

    would hihgly recommend everyone goes to this 'Airlines' website. It does look fake and I would love it if the worlds media was tricked by this as an elabourate April fools joke. If you look at their fleet of planes you can see why they would charge by weight and how it is as far removed as possible to the air travel we all know and love(hate).

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 117.

    Agree with waofy below But have you seen the size of their Aircraft? You would have to pay me to fly with them! "Flying Hairdriers"

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 116.

    Hopefully this will stop fatties taking up part of my seat as well as their own and I might be able to put the arm rest down. All we need to do now is stop kids kicking the back of my chair (or chop their feet off - either way is fine by me) and I might enjoy flying

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 115.

    If American Airlines adopted this they would be out of bankruptcy much sooner than expected

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 114.

    Excellent news. It would be really nice not to obsess over getting the kids' cases down to 20kg, and then stand in line behind some obese monster who's 20kg extra before luggage . . .

  • rate this
    -2

    Comment number 113.

    Too right as well! I'm fit and healthy and doing all I can to ensure I live to the life expectancy of someone in Britain - in other words I hope I won't be a burden on the NHS in later life like those who are overweight will more likely be... why can't I be rewarded for this with a slightly cheaper plane ticket? It's an incentive for people to lose weight if nothing else which can only be good!

  • rate this
    +151

    Comment number 112.

    FINALLY!! As someone of average weight, I hate paying for the overly large person next to me (especially when half of their bulk ends up spilling over the armrest into my seat!). Similarly, it truly irks me that my son, who weighs 45 lbs dripping wet is charged the same as the 350 lbs person who needs 2 seat belt extenders. Airline cost are based on moving mass over distance. Charge based on that.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 111.

    If this becomes standard policy across the airline industry, I foresee airlines bumping lighter passengers for more lucrative heavy passengers during peak travel times. Even though this seems like a great idea at first, airlines will try to make as much profit as possible. Smaller people WILL get pushed aside for more profitable large people.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 110.

    I like it .... maybe it will encourage some of the rather 'large' people to take some steps toward trimming their weight. The question is, how to adjust airfare if the person is not only on the heavy side, but is so heavy he/she requires use of a second seat. (Note - I am not exactly lightweight but do think something needs to be done to deal with people so large they take up a seat and a half.)

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 109.

    Good news for me, I'm 5ft 7" and 9 stone. Shame we're all so skint, we can't actually afford to fly anywhere.

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 108.

    Whilst they are at it, they should ban skin tight leggings.

    What an eyesore that can be...

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 107.

    @86.Mr Rumble"........men are more likely to weigh more than women"

    Have you not seen the size of plenty of women around today ! and I'm a woman,so this isn't a sexist remark.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 106.

    This is all well and good for people who are heavy because of their lifestyle choices. However, this is yet another problem for tall people who don't fit into companies' nice ergonomic standards. I already pay extra for clothes, never have enough leg room, constantly bang my head on low-hanging signs...*sigh*

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 105.

    Excellent idea: it makes perfect sense to pay for what you use.

 

Page 46 of 52

 

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