Inequality 'highest for 20 years' - Save The Children

 
A child stands next to a clothes line in the low income neighbourhood of Curundu in Panama City, 27 September 2012 Save The Children says inequality harms children's life chances

Related Stories

Global inequalities in wealth are at their highest level for 20 years and are growing, according to a new report by Save The Children.

While the charity acknowledges progress has been made in goals such as reducing child mortality, the report says this has been uneven across income groups.

Continuing inequality could hinder further progress in improving living standards, the charity says.

The report comes ahead of a meeting of a high-level UN panel on poverty.

"In recent decades the world has made dramatic progress in cutting child deaths and improving opportunities for children; we are now reaching a tipping point where preventable child deaths could be eradicated in our lifetime," Save the Children's chief executive, Justin Forsyth, said.

"Unless inequality is addressed... any future development framework will simply not succeed in maintaining or accelerating progress. What's more, it will hold individual countries - and the world - back from experiencing real growth and prosperity," Mr Forsyth added.

Save The Children's researchers found that in most of the 32 developing countries they looked at, the rich had increased their share of national income since the 1990s.

In a fifth of the countries, the incomes of the poorest had fallen over the same period.

The gap has become particularly pronounced among children and affects their well-being as well as causing disparities in several key indicators, the charity says.

For example, it notes that in Tanzania, child mortality in the richest fifth of the population fell from 135 to 90 per 1,000 births over the research period, while the poorest fifth saw hardly any progress with a modest fall of 140 to 137 per 1,000 births.

 

More on This Story

Related Stories

Comments

This entry is now closed for comments

Jump to comments pagination
 
  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 55.

    @53 moggy "11 hours and only 53 comments..."
    ----------
    Don't be silly there is another item regarding poverty and the PM. Most comments are there if you check.

    Either are pointless!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 54.

    Children are victim in developing countries where Governments Divide & Rule, lack of effective Global Population Control, Regional wars where mony is used to buy Guns instead Bread & the absence of clean water & Medication.The above creat Poverty which in turn makes childern suffer. The solution is Global narrowing of the Gap between the Rich & the Poor before IT knocks at Every Bodys' Door

  • Comment number 53.

    All this user's posts have been removed.Why?

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 52.

    Don't look to the US if Romney wins the election. Romney has said he doesn't even care about poor US children or those without health insurance let alone the plight of children around the world. To the American millionair class such people are invisible because they are not greedy enough to be millionairs themselves and join the ruling capitalist oligarchy. The rest are exploited worker slaves.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 51.

    It is a myth that global inequality doesn't impact on the poorest. Global inequality contributes to the increasing poverty of the poorest. Not just because of the impact of direct exploitation, but because they raise the cost of commodities for everyone.

    Its also a myth that population growth is caused current by birth rates its caused by increasing longevity. Current birth rates are sustainable.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 50.

    Sharing, Justice and Peace for all will help Save Our Planet.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 49.

    A confused analysis.

    Poverty harms children, not inequality per se.

    If a child's family has a good income, what does it matter what the family next door earns? Or put another way - is it best to have a welathy but unequal society (eg UK) or a poor country with flattened incomes (eg Cuba)?

    This report is 1970s style, shallow, anti-enterprise and pro-envy politicking.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 48.

    It is beginning to appear that many of these countries are almost ready for a Maoist Revolution similar to that of 1949 China. As long as unbridled Capitalism flourishes in these countries, this gap will only get ever wider!

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 47.

    46.mscracker
    Eugenics is alive & well in 2012


    Forms of Eugenics are endemic around the world & existed long before westerners put a name to it.

    Marrying within tribes/castes, religions, aristocracy, Royalty, etc etc is no different.

    What does a UK Asian muslim say to a son/daughter who wants to marry a white Catholic, most object to it, same vice versa.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 46.

    @28.Peter Dewsnap,
    Eugenics is alive & well in 2012.

  • rate this
    -2

    Comment number 45.

    Global inequalities in wealth are at their highest level for 20 years and are growing, according to a new report by Save The Children


    1990, world population was 5.2962 billion, 19 years later( 2011) world population is 6.9737 billion.

    Increases of inequality and poverty are FACTUALLY more of a consequence of continued unsustainable population growth than wealth distribution

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 44.

    The recent years the gap between the rich and the poor has increased
    dramatically, only the very richest have access to quality healthcare and have the opportunity to enjoy a life full of prosperity.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 43.

    The impact on children is the most shameful part of the growing wealth gap. This isn't just happening in developing countries, but right here in the West as well.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 42.

    Wealth inequality is a stupid, divisive term. Jealousy apart It doesn't matter what the difference in wealth between richest and poorest is as long as the "poor" have enough to live on.

    Its the income of the poor falling which is the real problem here.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 41.

    I recall my 10 year old son reaction when I commented that I could not understand how third countries people found the strength to make children: "Mom, you do not understand, that is the only power left to them". I was flabbergasted.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 40.

    >we are now reaching a tipping point where preventable child deaths could be eradicated in our lifetime

    Will be a milestone. But how much the effort worth if not combined with an adequate birth control?

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 39.

    Families, families, families. Reward people for not having children. If they don't, the future is not good. I've started and up until now have no children, reward me for helping to save the planet Mr Cameron?. Start a downward trend through reward of sensibility.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 38.

    A situation with lots of people with no resources looks at first glance like there are too many people. Theft from the poor by the rich looks like overpopulation, but it isn't. It isn't that there are too many people, it's that a minority are hogging the opportunity to survive comfortably

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 37.

    Save the children,..?. Yes until much later in life and not so many. Prevention is better than cure, or attempted cures. The more people alive, the more the suffering, both now and on into the future, which is extremely unpredictable, but not too bright seeming. less people, less suffering, more room, more living space for all life. Save a life today, procreate less. Education, education for all.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 36.

    Will free trade smooth children inequality?

 

Page 1 of 3

 

More World stories

RSS

Features

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.