South East Wales

Insole Court, Llandaff: Cardiff renovation is approved

Insole court
Image caption Supporters held hands around the building in September 2012

Backers of the restoration of a Grade II listed Victorian mansion in Cardiff say they are delighted to have won planning permission.

Cardiff's Insole Court Trust has £761,724 to repair the stables for community and educational functions.

The planning approval also includes converting adjacent outbuildings in to a visitors' centre and tea rooms, as well as to help restore the gardens.

The trust aims to raise £5m to restore the building.

Insole Court was begun in the early 1850s by colliery owner James Harvey Insole, and Cardiff council is working with the trust to turn it into a community building.

Blueprints for the work have been on display since March 2012.

The trust said: "The project will restore the Victorian mansion in Llandaff to its former splendour, and also create a community hub and tea room in the stables.

"It will provide heritage tours of the house assisted by volunteer guides and tour leaders.

"There will be opportunities for employment and social enterprises with facilities for the community including a centre for older people, a parent and toddler centre, craft workshops and a community hall."

Image caption Insole Court took on a more gothic appearance in the recent snow

Trust chair Sir Norman Lloyd-Edwards said: "The architects, consultants, Cardiff council and the trust have all worked together on the plans and we are delighted to have gained planning permission.

"We are now looking to strengthen the trust board to move the project forward and are looking for trustees with expertise in strategic finance, change management and fundraising."

Neil Richardson, Insole Court project director, said: "Gaining planning permission moves the trust a step closer to taking over the management of Insole Court on behalf of the community.

"There is still a lot of work to do, particularly in fundraising, but we hope to start work on the stables in the autumn."

James Harvey Insole extended the mansion and developed it over the years, including a tower based on the one at Cardiff Castle.

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