Wood's speech at left wing Scottish event is criticised

Leanne Wood Leanne Wood is using her speech to argue an independent Scotland could lead the way on social justice

Labour has accused Plaid Cymru leader Leanne Wood of making an error of judgement by speaking at a left-wing Scottish independence group's event.

The Radical Independence Campaign (RIC) opposes some key policies of Plaid's Cymru's sister party the SNP.

RIC backs abolition of the monarchy and economic and social policies to the left of the mainstream parties.

Plaid said the speech showed people from different political persuasions were supporting Scottish independence.

The SNP's vision of independence includes keeping the Queen, the pound and EU membership.

Labour has questioned why Ms Wood chose to make a speech on Tuesday evening, outlining her view that an independent Scotland could act as a "beacon of social justice", at a RIC function.

SNP opposition

Labour AM Ann Jones said: "The Radical Independence Campaign are vehemently opposed to Plaid Cymru's sister party, the SNP - accusing them of following Thatcherite economic policy and undermining their arguments on the economy, currency and North Sea oil.

"Leanne Wood needs to make clear whether she agrees with RIC's criticisms of the SNP and is making a principled stand, or whether this was a huge political gaffe.

"Not least we need to understand what the new Plaid position on the currency union is - do they want separate currencies for Scotland, and Wales?"

'Beacon'

But Plaid Cymru said the Yes campaign in Scotland was a grassroots movement not tied to any single political party.

A party spokeswoman said: "It's great to see people from several different political persuasions working together towards a common goal of building a better future for Scotland.

"Leanne will be using her speech in Glasgow tonight to highlight how through becoming an independent nation, Scotland could be a beacon of social justice, showing that there is an alternative to the austerity agenda."

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