The Silk commission jigsaw and Danny's diary marker

 

It is, according to the Treasury chief secretary, the last piece in the Silk jigsaw. (They'll be having Silk tea towels and mugs next).

Ministers in the coalition government can't agree whether control of stamp duty land tax should pass from Westminster to Wales, so they will consult industry on the proposal contained in the Silk commission report.

The (Liberal Democrat) Chief Secretary, Danny Alexander, clearly wants to finish the jigsaw. The (Conservative) Welsh Secretary, David Jones, is rather more cautious and could probably cope if there were one or two Silk recommendations that got lost behind the sofa.

Labour see the consultation as a delaying tactic, arguing that business has already been consulted. The UK government argues that consultation was confined to Wales and didn't assess opinion over the border.

The consultation may or may not ease coalition tensions on the issue but one question stands out: what happens if the conclusions agree with one half of the coalition. Does the other half back down?

Mr Alexander announced the consultation in a written ministerial statement to parliament here. Note the reference to "early access to borrowing" to enable the Welsh government to pay for improvements to the M4. This follows a similar move in Scotland, where a system of "pre-payments" has allowed Holyrood ministers to access finance before the Scotland Act comes into force.

Given the delay in the UK government responding to the Silk report - originally promised by the end of Spring - I asked Danny Alexander to clarify when autumn finishes in the Treasury calendar.

"September or October" came the reply. Make a note in your diaries now.

 
David Cornock, Parliamentary correspondent, Wales Article written by David Cornock David Cornock Parliamentary correspondent, Wales

Reshuffle fever reaches Wales Office

Change at the Wales Office? What does the imminent cabinet reshuffle mean for Welsh MPs?

Read full article

Comments

This entry is now closed for comments

Jump to comments pagination
 
  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 69.

    ... #66, the West Lothian question is not related to business, it relates to Scottish Labour polititicians voting through legislation that only relates to an issue in England, Education in particular.

    With regard to your comments, have you ever answered a question .............. ?!

    In this matter, Silk is dead in the water, Westminster has at long last woken to the devolution nightmare.
    .

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 68.

    Re 67

    Boxer

    'Let's not drag the Language issues into this one.'

    Oh, if only...!

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 67.

    " clearly, you no know of no example of English only legislation being held up "
    Clearly, you intended ' England-only legislation '.

    Let's not drag the Language issues into this one.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 66.

    Re 65

    John,

    No, it comes nowhere near explaining your fetish for the West Lothian question.

    And, clearly, you no know of no example of English only legislation being held up because of having to consult with Welsh business. So, the premise of your thesis was completely erroneous.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 65.

    ... 64, obviously you are unable to understand the simplest of sentences, it reminds me of my grandfather long since passed this way, he would say

    There's none so blind as those who will not see.

    .

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 64.

    Re 62

    John,

    Yet again, you make no attempt to answer a question. It seems you have no answers.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 63.

    #60 Dafydd (is that correct ?) THe 'West Lothian Question' is one of those useful bits of jargon that compresses a lot of constitutional history and legal decisions into a simple phrase.
    Obviously, lawyers like this sort of thing c.f. 'Wednesbury' for anything to do with judicial review and the reasonability of public decisions.
    Both are jargon, but not there to baffle the public.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 62.

    ... #60, this is our constitution in motion, addressing the Lothian question, changes are afoot. This is a demonstration of "messy is good", politically speaking, unfortunately there is a political deficit here in Wales called "a lack of scrutiny", and it doesn't go away.
    .

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 61.

    #58
    The WG get consulted on English only legislation routinely, it is up to the WG if they want to open up that consultation to other bodies etc in Wales.

    But it seems at the moment with their slender majority they are keen on getting as much legislation rushed through with very little scrutiny.

    At the same time watering down the changes in the building regulations at the behest of Redrow et al.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 60.

    Re 57

    John,

    You have often defended the unwritten constitution - conceding that it may be messy, but that you are quite happy with that. So, why the fetish regarding the so-called West Lothian question - something thought up by yet another rather grand sounding Old-Etonian who certainly doesn't live in the same world as me.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 59.

    It is quite obvious the businesses being consulted are house builders and property developers, if they see theirselves being disadvantaged and stamp duty revenues for those border areas decline it would be a dereliction not to have consulted them, somerthing I question should have been done from the outset not know, maybe something the Chief Secretary to the Treasury forgot to do.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 58.

    It seems you're not allowed to mention certain councils! I'll re-post the rest.

    Re 50

    John,
    I note - with little surprise - that you were unable to answer my question re. England only legislation being held up by consultation with Welsh business.

    Are you implying here (the structure of your sentence shows that you agree with the thesis) that Wales is, and always has been, neglected by accident?

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 57.

    ... Silk is not a good option for the taxpayers, neither is it a good option for democracy in Wales, until such time as the West Lothian question has been resolved, and we have scrutiny at Cardiff Bay politics should stand still.

    There is plenty of time for change ......
    .

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 56.

    #49 "Surely you can do better than deliberately misinterpret what I actually said. "
    In your #20 you said "And what dictatorial powers do you believe you possess that can wish away Silk?"
    I endeavoured to point out that democratic powers suffice to overturn the report of a committee selected to produce a result. I don't believe I misrepresented you. You believe in Silk; I don't.

  • Comment number 55.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 54.

    #51 Since you didn't answer the point, may I assume that far from my losing the argument, you now accept the point that at the higher levels of chess - to which neither of us aspired - games are not played to the end and no-one says checkmate.
    As said, it is for the loser to concede, not for one contestant to declare himself the victor.
    A search for truth is not pomposity.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 53.

    The lunacy continues. Wales only qualifications meaning that Welsh kids will only get into Welsh universities, ending any chance of mobility. Still the middle class will vite with their 4x4's and move to England. Well done trough guzzlers!

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 52.

    Every time the fools make something in Wales different to England another raft of industry asks itself whether it can be bothered to run a different set of rules for probably less than 5% of their business?

    The logical answer is likely to be NO!

    So Wales is relentlously cutting itself off from the mainstream and everybody suffers except the snouts in the public sector trough.

    Economic suicide!!

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 51.

    48. A sideshow you induced with your pompous response. Thank you for admitting your status as an armchair spectator.

    As I said you lost the argument. You have reduced yourself to dense convoluted allegories and petty (statistically farcical) insults in your clear desire to win a point.

    Pull your head out of the sand Boxer!

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 50.

    ... #49, the heat must be getting to you ...

    neglect, putting down, vindictive,

    ... and all an expression of enjoyment by Westminster.

    The reality is different, there are no deliberate actions that put down or are vindictive, and who but our home grown political cadre in CB are responsible for our Health Service neglect ...

    We don't have your negatives in Caerphilly ....
    .

 

Page 1 of 4

 

Features

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.