Caernarfon air crash: Tributes paid to Iain Nuttall

Iain Nuttall Iain Nuttall, 37, was killed in the Caernarfon aircrash on Sunday

Related Stories

The wife of a man killed in a light aircraft crash in Gwynedd has said her husband was a "loving and devoted family man".

Iain Nuttall, 37, from Blackburn, Lancashire died when the Piper Cherokee plane piloted by his own father crashed at Caernarfon Airport on Sunday.

Mr Nuttall's five-year-old son and the pilot, 62, were also seriously injured and remain in hospital.

An air accident investigation into the incident is continuing.

All three members of the Nuttall family had been flying from Blackpool on a day trip to north Wales when the accident happened just before 11:30 BST on Sunday.

Witnesses say the single-engine four-seater plane appeared to have clipped trees before being flipped onto its roof several metres short of the runway at the airfield at Dinas Dinlle.

'Never be forgotten'

Michelle Nuttall said: "Iain was a wonderful and devoted father, who loved his son to pieces."

The couple had been married for 14 years.

Mrs Nuttall said her husband would "never be forgotten" by her or their son.

In a statement, his family also said they were "struggling to believe this has happened", and that he was a loving son, brother and uncle.

Mr Nuttall had served with the Kings Own Royal Border Regiment for about eight years, after joining at the age of 17.

The light aircraft wreckage The plane had been flying from Blackpool when it crashed at Caernarfon airport

He left the army shortly after getting married and worked in security and then as a lorry driver until his death.

"He had a passion for motorcycles, and enjoyed spending time out riding with friends and attending motorcycling events," added his wife.

The names of the two other people injured in the crash have not been released.

More on This Story

Related Stories

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

BBC North West Wales

Weather

Anglesey

17 °C 13 °C

Features

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.