Ice fall by Snowdon climber Mark Roberts captured on camera

Climber Mark Roberts captured his 100ft fall down Mount Snowdon on his head camera

Dramatic scenes showing a climber's 100ft (30m) fall down a gully on Snowdon have been published online.

Climber and a safety consultant Mark Roberts, 47, was wearing a head camera when he lost his grip despite using ice axes, plunging over rocks and snow.

"You just try not to panic and hope there's some luck with you," he tells the British Mountaineering Council website which has posted his film.

He was airlifted to hospital with ankle injuries but was not seriously hurt.

The incident happened when Mr Roberts was climbing with two companions in February near Crib Goch.

Start Quote

I was a little dazed and knew there was some damage to my ankles which were fairly painful”

End Quote Mark Roberts Climber

Recounting his lucky escape, he said: "Once both axes were gone, it was arms, hands, legs and feet in the less consolidated snow on the slope to try and slow my speed.

"Fortunately I slid into a rocky outcrop on my left with a bit of a thump, which took some of the momentum out of my descent resulting in a bit of a spin, but I could still look for opportunities below for a point to stop.

"It finished with a drop on to a bit of a ledge or hole where my pack and crampons took enough hold to stop me.

"I was a little dazed and knew there was some damage to my ankles which were fairly painful if they were moved."

Llanberis Mountain Rescue Team and a helicopter crew from RAF Valley at Anglesey took part in the rescue.

After being flown to Ysbyty Gwynedd hospital at Bangor the helicopter returned to fly his rescuers and companions off Snowdon.

Mountain rescuer Elfyn Jones said: "Accidents do happen but Mark was well-equipped, wearing a helmet, and that probably saved his life."

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