Michael Lundstram jailed for Susan Griffiths road death

A hit-and-run driver who left a woman dying in a road after colliding with her bicycle has been jailed for eight months.

Michael Lundstram, 29, of Llandudno, Conwy, admitted causing the death of mother-of-five Susan Griffiths, 47, in Dwygyfylchi while uninsured.

At Caernarfon Crown Court, he also admitted failing to stop after an accident and having two worn tyres.

In addition to jail, he was banned from driving for two-and-a-half years.

The court heard Lundstram's Ford Mondeo collided with Ms Griffiths as she rode to work at 05:30 BST on 9 December.

Prosecutor Ian Evans said: "The defendant didn't stop at the scene at all to see if she was all right nor did he telephone the emergency services."

Start Quote

Sentences for these offences can't remotely reflect the tragic consequences, nor are they intended to do so”

End Quote Judge Niclas Parry

Instead, the court heard, he fled and abandoned the car nearby before hiding in bushes.

He gave himself up later that morning.

Mr Evans said: "There's no evidence to suggest the standard of the defendant's driving fell short of that required."

The court was also told the condition of the worn tyres did not contribute to the incident.

Ms Griffiths was found by a man on his way to work and died in hospital.

The court heard how an insurance company had cancelled Lundstram's policy for failing to provide no claims proof.

The company also had not been told of a six-month "totting" ban in 2009.

Judge Niclas Parry said Lundstram had entrusted someone else to make a proper insurance application.

Then, after the collision, he fled and hid on a nearby mountain "without giving any consideration to whether Susan Griffiths was dead or alive".

He told the defendant: "Sentences for these offences can't remotely reflect the tragic consequences, nor are they intended to do so."

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