Public Service watchdog in Wales wants more privacy power

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Wales could become the first UK nation to have an independent watchdog with the power to stop the publication of some of its reports and to prosecute those who go against its wishes.

Public Services Ombudsman Peter Tyndall wants more confidentially powers to protect vulnerable people.

It would mean complainants could face contempt of court charges if they go to the media.

But some warn it would mean less transparency.

Mr Tyndall told BBC Wales Today's Jamie Owen why he thought the privacy move is needed.

Watchdog wants more privacy power

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