Wales

Light snowfall in parts of Wales, and more expected

  • 14 January 2013
  • From the section Wales

A light covering of snow fell in some parts of Wales overnight and some more will follow later, but forecasters say ice is a more widespread problem.

The snow came down on higher ground on parts of eastern Wales, the first of 2013 for many areas.

Rural and elevated communities in north east Wales and the south east valleys have seen most of the snowfall.

The Met Office says ice is a more common problem, particularly in border counties.

BBC Wales weather presenter Sue Charles said: "We'll see a few snow showers at lower levels tonight."

She said any snowfall was most likely to be in higher areas of mid Wales and in elevated areas of the north east and south east.

She added: "Last night temperatures dropped to -2C in the Radnor hills, the coldest place in Wales.

"But as clearer skies develop tonight, temperatures will tumble, with lows of -5C possible, so any fresh snow is likely to freeze overnight."

Parts of England have seen some light snow overnight, as forecasters warn a second, heavier, band will fall across large areas of the UK in the afternoon.

The Met Office has issued an amber "be prepared" warning for snow disruption in north-east England, Yorkshire and Humber, and the East Midlands.

Wales and south-east England are also expected to see some snow during Monday, with the far south-west of England and Northern Ireland being the only regions untouched by the severe cold.

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