Catherine Zeta Jones renames Children's Hospital for Wales

Swansea-born Catherine Zeta Jones took a break from filming her latest movie to pay a visit and unveil the hospital's new name

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Hollywood actress Catherine Zeta Jones has officially renamed the Children's Hospital for Wales in Cardiff.

Its new name, the Noah's Ark Children's Hospital for Wales, was unveiled by the star on Friday .

The Swansea-born actress is a patron of The Noah's Ark Appeal, set up to raise funds for the building, and she officially opened the hospital in 2006.

The actress and her husband, the actor Michael Douglas, donated a five-figure sum to The Noah's Ark Appeal in 2005.

The appeal has already donated £12m to the hospital and is on course to raise an additional £8m by 2015, when a second phase of the building is expected to be completed.

The Ocean's Twelve and The Mask of Zorro star won a best supporting actress Oscar in 2003 for her role in Chicago.

Paul Hollard, deputy chief executive of Cardiff and Vale University Health Board, said the Welsh government would meet the £64m capital costs to build the second phase of the hospital, while the Noah's Ark Appeal had committed itself to raising an additional £8m towards equipment.

Lyn Jones, chairman of the Noah's Ark Appeal, said many people had worked tirelessly to provide children in Wales with the best facilities and equipment available.

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