BBC Wales drama village name unveiled as Roath Lock

BBC Wales Today's Nick Palit hears from Andy Lee, construction project manager at the site.

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BBC Wales' new drama village will be known as Roath Lock, it has been announced.

The name was revealed as part of a topping-out ceremony to mark completion of the building shell in Cardiff Bay.

Plans to strengthen the BBC's presence in north-east Wales have also been unveiled.

It will move into purpose built facilities at Glyndŵr University's new Creative Industries building in Wrexham.

At the ceremony for the new studio complex in Cardiff, BBC Cymru Wales Director Menna Richards paid tribute to those working together to deliver the new project.

"It's exactly 12 months since we confirmed our plans to build a drama centre in Cardiff Bay," she said.

Start Quote

Reaffirms our commitment to north east Wales and will enable us to produce even better content ”

End Quote Menna Richards BBC Cymru Wales Director

"There's still a lot more work to do, but once completed, Roath Lock studios will become a focal point for the creative industries in Wales - brimming with energy and talent - and we are all extremely proud to be a part of the project."

She praised the partnership between the assembly government, Cardiff council and igloo Regeneration - as well as the construction team from Vinci.

When finished, the 170,000 sq ft (15793 sq m) studios will be equivalent to the size of three football pitches, providing a permanent home to three flagship BBC dramas - Casualty, Pobol y Cwm and Doctor Who.

The centre is being built as part of the BBC's commitment in 2008 to double television network production from Wales.

Deputy First Minister, Ieuan Wyn Jones described it as an important milestone in the project.

"I wish the BBC every success in its activities at this exciting new development," he said.

Artist's impression of how Roath Lock will look when completed The drama village will also be home to Doctor Who from 2012

"It will play an important role in increasing Welsh-made production by the BBC which will not only benefit audiences, but the Welsh economy and our creative industries in particular."

The name Roath Lock was chosen following consultation with BBC Wales staff.

The lock refers to the waterway linking Roath Basin to Roath Dock and the Bay, and the studios are being built next to the former lock-keeper's cottage.

As well as revealing the new name for the studio complex, details of plans for the corporation in north-east Wales were also made public.

The BBC Wales offices in Wrexham will move to a new facility at the town's Glyndŵr University.

Housed in the university's new creative industries building, it is hoped the development will be more accessible to the public, and allow new partnerships to be built with local businesses and the education community.

Ms Richards said it "reaffirms our commitment to north-east Wales and will enable us to produce even better content for our audiences".

Professor Michael Scott, Vice-Chancellor of Glyndŵr University, added: "The presence of the BBC within the centre is a stamp of approval for the high standard of its TV, radio and online production facilities which will benefit not only our students but the people of north-east Wales for years to come."

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