Braille art exhibition to open at Abertay University

Braille print One of David Lyons' prints that will be on display at the exhibition

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A new exhibition exploring the decline of Braille is opening at the University of Abertay.

Double Blind Test Series is an exhibition of print works highlighting the artistic research by Abertay lecturer and researcher David Lyons.

The exhibition explores the use Braille in different forms because of its decline in popularity as a communication tool.

The series opens at the end of July and runs until 9 August.

The lecturer and researcher said: "With this series of prints I travelled from a narrow interest in Braille to a much broader interest in vision and visions, layering Braille elements, literary texts and the Ishihara Colour Blind test.

"It is my hope that they communicate engaging sensory experiences to people of varied sighted abilities."

Lyons produced 12 prints that use visual elements from various sources, including layouts and colours influenced by the Ishihara Colour Blind Test plates and his readings on colour blindness.

Selections of text from William Blake, Aldous Huxley and Tom Wolfe are used as visual texture.

Lyons' series of prints aim to be visually and tactically expressive, engaging the blind, the colour-blind, partially sighted and the sighted.

The exhibition, Double Blind Test Series, is free and open to the public running from 29 July to 9 August at the University of Abertay Dundee's Hannah Maclure Centre.

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