Tayside and Central Scotland

Scone Palace archway is restored after van crash

Scone Palace Archway
Image caption The 16th century arch was all that remained of the approach to the former Augustinian abbey at Scone
16th century arch debris. Pic by James Cook
Image caption The arch was destroyed after the van being driven by a contractor crashed into it
Stonemason working on a stone archway at Scone Palace
Image caption A team of stonemasons and sculptors were brought in to restore the arch
Scone arch panel
Image caption Stonemasons had to use drawings and plaster cast models to recreate carvings from the archway's original central heraldic panels.
Scone arch rebuilt
Image caption It took conservationists over two years to restore the archway

A historic archway at Scone Palace in Perthshire has been restored after it was reduced to rubble by a van.

The 16th Century arch, which sits in the grounds of the palace, was all that remained of the approach to the former Augustinian abbey at Scone.

It was destroyed in September 2010 when a contractor crashed into it.

The restoration project has taken stonemasons and sculptors over two years to complete.

Scone Palace is best known as the site where Scotland's Kings were crowned and the original home to the Stone of Destiny.

William Murray is a member of the family which owns Scone Palace and a direct descendant of David Murray of Gospetrie, the 1st viscount Stormont, who oversaw construction of the arch around 1590.

Fantastic restoration

He said the family were delighted to see it rebuilt.

Mr Murray said: "It looks fantastic, it really does. I knew when we got the masons involved and the heritage trust from Perthshire involved, we had a really good team and I was confident that we would get it looking better again.

"But this is better than anything I could have imagined."

As well as rebuilding the actual arch, conservationists had to use drawings and plaster cast models to recreate carvings from the archway's original central heraldic panels.

The restoration work has been led by Mid Lothian based structural engineer John Addison, of Addison Conservation and Design.

More on this story

Related Internet links

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites