Andy Murray to go on walkabout in Dunblane

Andy with trophy Murray is the first British man to win a grand slam since 1936

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Andy Murray is to visit his hometown on Sunday to give his friends, family and the local community a chance to celebrate his summer of success.

The US Open champion and Olympic gold medallist will arrive in Dunblane on an open-top bus before taking part in a walkabout around the Stirling town.

He will finish at the Dunblane Tennis Club courts where his journey began.

Murray, who was unable to make the Olympic parade in Glasgow, said: "It's definitely going to be emotional."

He is due to arrive in the town at about 12:00 BST then walk up Perth Road to Beech Road, along High Street (stopping at his golden postbox) before continuing up High Street to Fourways Roundabout and into the tennis courts.

He will then take part in a Set4Sport activity with his mother Judy.

Murray said: "I can't wait to get back to Dunblane to where it all began and share my US Open victory with everyone and thank them for all the support.

"It's definitely going to be emotional, but it's a very special place for me."

Dunblane locals watch the game The Dunblane Hotel was packed out with fans for Monday night's US Open final

Stirling Provost Mike Robbins, who will be Murray's host and deliver a welcome on behalf of the whole area, said: "We're so thrilled that Andy's coming.

"It's always a pleasure to welcome him back, but this time, of course, it's extra, extra special.

"I visited local schools the morning after his US Open triumph, and everyone was just buzzing. The one thing the children wanted was the chance to say 'well done', and now we will all be able to do just that."

Central Scotland Police warned of traffic disruption as large numbers are expected to turn out for the visit.

There will be road closures in place and there will be no vehicular access to Beech Road or High Street.

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