Dandy owner DC Thomson to end comic's printed edition

 
Desperate Dan DC Thomson said the final print edition would not mark the end of characters like Desperate Dan

The publisher of one of the world's longest-running children's comics, The Dandy, has confirmed plans to stop printing the title.

DC Thomson said printing would end with a special edition released on the comic's 75th anniversary on 4 December.

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Rather like the News of the World, the print edition is set to go out with a flourish.”

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However, the Dundee-based company insisted it would not be the end of The Dandy or its characters.

It said it had "exciting" online plans after sales slumped to 8,000 a week from a high of two million in the 50s.

The Dandy, which launched in 1937, has featured characters such as Bananaman, Korky the Cat, Cuddles and Dimples, and Beryl the Peril, along with Desperate Dan.

As well as issuing a special edition for the final print run, the comic will also include a reprint of the first edition of The Dandy.

DC Thomson's Ellis Watson said the company wanted to ensure the comic would be popular with future generations.

The Dandy The Dandy is set to disappear from the shelves by the end of the year

Mr Watson explained: "We're counting down 110 days until the big 75th anniversary bash and we're working on some tremendously exciting things.

"Dan has certainly not eaten his last cow pie. All of The Dandy's characters are just 110 days away from a new lease of life."

A book celebrating the 75th anniversary of The Dandy was launched at the Edinburgh International Book Festival this week and the comic will also feature in exhibitions at the National Library of Scotland and the Cartoon Museum.

A bronze statue of Desperate Dan stands in Dundee city centre, alongside Minnie the Minx, from The Dandy's sister title The Beano.

 

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  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 119.

    I must have been six when Dandy first came out but I don't remember when I first read it. However it must have been by the age of eight as I had started before I left my first home to remove elsewhere.

    Desperate Dan and his cow pie stick in my mind still; together with a black cat whose name I cannot now remember. Publication day was always a treasured day in the week.

  • rate this
    +4

    Comment number 118.

    news of this nature makes me realise how times have changed and like I am like some other posters here, the same generation. We all had favourite comics and at Christmas we all looked forward to the Annuals. I believe we were of a golden generation when we enterd into a realm of imagination that today seems to be beyond the realm of many of today's kids and we have great memories. Thanks DC comics

  • rate this
    -2

    Comment number 117.

    I think the Dandy and beano were always marketed at parents.

    Personally I used to love 2000AD, got it every week yet every christmas I had to smile and say thanks for a Dandy or Beano annual I never wanted and couldn't swap for anything better because all the other kids had one too.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 116.

    Sadw news, I learned to read with The Dandy and The Beano.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 115.

    I too was an avid reader of The Dandy and The Beano as a child. I still have a collection of 1970's and early 1980's Beano Annuals. Neither comic today resembles the old versions I enjoyed. Sadly DC Thompson ruined their best assets when they tried to make them glossy and trendy and succumbed to modern political correctness.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 114.

    Very sad news this for all of us who recall The Dandy in its' heyday Having said that, I looked at a copy in a local Supermarket today, and thought it was a poor comic, compared to the one I read in the 1950's and early 60's. Also I thought it overpriced at £1.99. I'll be sad to see it go, but nothing lasts forever. How long till The Beano goes the same way ?

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 113.

    as a senior citizen scottish-canadian expat, I want to thank the Dandy and other British comics who helped me through some serious 1950's childhood ailments. I am sorry to read of the demise of the Dandy, but, as others have pointed out, it's no' the same read as it was in the Golden Age of British comics in days of yore.

    Thank you Dandy, enjoy your rest

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 112.

    Extremely sad news!!! I suppose it will head for the internet, now. But I'm sure it'll be back, when reading from paper will be a refreshing change from that on a screen.

    Thanks Dandy, for entertaining me throughout my childhood and beyond and, also, for instilling my passion for cartooning!

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 111.

    Oudinot in comment 66 says he/she is a teacher. I hope he/she doesn't teach English as there are four spurious apostrophes in line two. Please learn the difference between a plural and a possessive.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 110.

    AAAH cow pie, the good old days before we were fed a continuous stream of B/S.

  • rate this
    +6

    Comment number 109.

    My Dad tried to make me read the Boys Own Paper - unsuccessfully! I would not give up my 2d a week spent on the Dandy in the early 1950's. Desperate Dan, Lord Snooty, Biffo the Bear, Dennis etc etc or am I muddling some characters up with the Beano which I read as well? And while I think about it I read Film Fun too! Aahh nostalgia....not what it used to be!
    I shall buy another Dandy tomorrow!

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 108.

    Lot of rose tinted glasses stuff here. Things move on and so do comics. What parents insist their childern buy this every week now . Probably none.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 107.

    @60. What next, RIP Oor Willie?

    Is Oor Willie still going?

    Forty years ago I used to receive 'his' cartoons in the post from my Aunt in Glasgow. They were then circulated around the school classroom as you couldn't get them in the south-east!

    Wonderful memories!

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 106.

    I still laugh at Desperate Dan's antics but then those of us who do are a dying breed. I think one has to have this kind of humour all around rather than isolated. If the mainstream comics of today just stand up telling fruity stories rather than jokes, then the Dandy is old hat to a lot of people, I'm afraid.

    I still like the Clitheroe Kid, too!

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 105.

    As a boy I was an avid reader.

    Twenty years later I found both the Dandy (and Beano) on the internal magazine list (being the most popular periodicals)!

    Forty years later it is a shame to see the Dandy's graceful departure.

    But thanks for all the fun!

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 104.

    Loved The Dandy and The Beano when I was young. Through grit and determination, I managed to complete my Beano / Dandy 50th anniversary sticker album hoping it would be worth a few quid some day. I've still got it, and according to E-bay, it's worth a tenner which is probably less than I spent on the stickers!

  • rate this
    +4

    Comment number 103.

    Love the Dandy - hate the way the moderators are arbitrarily ending active / popular threads and censoring free speech - what the hell is going on at the Beeb?

  • rate this
    -3

    Comment number 102.

    @34. Livid of Liverpool - tube - you (and people like you) are the reason that anyone is discussing Scottish independence, and the break up of the union, at all. Scotland was a nation when your part of the world was still a part of the minor Kingdom of Northumbria and the Scots have been on this island of Great Britain longer than anyone else . . .

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 101.

    It would seem to me that a lot of the decline was due to the meddling of DC Thompson as much as kids deserting the comic. You see that the introduction of real life characters such as Harry Hill led to a 50% drop in circulation, for a start. Sometimes it can be a case of assuming you know what a child or person wants. Dandy Xtreme etc found they were very much out of touch.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 100.

    Im 25 and i never ready the dandy growing because even then the humour was horribly out of touch with the times. I reckon generations older than mine that have been keeping it afloat

    They tried to modernise it, but not enough... and if they did it would be completely different from what it is now and even further what its fans once loved.

 

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