Royal wedding: New Scots title for royal couple

Picture of the royal couple The prince will have titles linking him to each country in the union

Prince William and Kate Middleton are to take the titles Earl and Countess of Strathearn, linking them to the country where they first met.

The pair began their relationship eight years ago while students in St Andrews, Fife, which is close to the Perthshire region of Strathearn.

The royal groom was given the title by the Queen to mark his marriage.

Strathearn, which means Valley of the River Earn, stretches from the central lowlands to the Highlands.

The region has had royal connections since Robert Stewart, High Steward of Scotland, was created Earl of Strathearn in 1357.

It was last used in a royal title in 1943 by Queen Victoria's great grandson Alastair Windsor, who was known as the 2nd Duke of Connaught and Strathearn.

The picturesque area of Perthshire, which once belonged to Queen Victoria's father, lies near the middle of mainland Scotland and includes the towns of Crieff, Auchterarder and Comrie.

'Medieval years'

Following their wedding, the royal couple will also be known as the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge as well as the Baron and Baroness Carrickfergus.

The additional titles link the prince to each country in the United Kingdom.

Genealogist Charles Kidd, editor of Debrett's Peerage And Baronetage, a reference book of the aristocracy, said the Cambridge title also had a Scottish link.

He said: "It goes right back into the medieval years of the royal family. Richard, Earl of Cambridge, was grandfather of Edward IV.

"The first Duke of Cambridge was the seventh son of George III and a chancellor of St Andrews University in Scotland where William and Kate met.

"It's also good that the Prince becomes Earl of Strathearn and Baron Carrickfergus - as he is Prince William of Wales, that means everyone is included."

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