London 2012: Olympic flame arrives in Scotland

Olympic flame The Olympic flame touched down after travelling by ferry from Northern Ireland

The Olympic flame has arrived in Scotland by ferry from Northern Ireland ahead of its tour around the country.

It landed on Scottish soil for a ceremony at the P&O ferry terminal at Cairnyran in Dumfries and Galloway.

The public will get their first sight of the torch early on Friday morning, when it leaves the town Stranraer at 06:00 BST.

The flame reached the UK on 18 May and landed in Scotland at the end of day 20 of its journey towards London.

Although closed to the public, the arrival at Cairnryan was televised live on Reporting Scotland.

Doreen Bowie, who will be a torchbearer, carried the flame from the ferry.

She said: "I just can't believe that I was lucky enough to be the one that was chosen to meet the flame, it's just incredible."

Cities and glens

The torch was being met by Scotland Office minister David Mundell and Shona Robison, the Scottish government's minister for Commonwealth Games and Sport.

The flame will spend seven days in the country before passing south across the border into Northumberland on 14 June.

It will loop back into Scotland to spend half a day in Dumfriesshire later in the month.

The UK government's Scottish Secretary Michael Moore said: "The Torch Relay will put our cities, towns, islands and glens on the global stage and show why Scotland is one of the world's favourite tourism destinations."

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Dumfries and Galloway Council leader Ivor Hyslop was among the welcoming party as it landed in the south west of the country.

He said: "I am looking forward to welcoming the Olympic flame to Stranraer and Cairnryan and feel honoured to host the first moment in Scotland.

"This promises to be an historic moment and will be our moment to shine in front of the world's media.

"I am sure residents from the wider Dumfries and Galloway area will come out in force to support the inspirational torchbearers from our region."

The relay proper starts in Stranraer on Friday morning.

The build-up begins at 05:20 BST with music in Castle Square.

The torch procession arrives 10 minutes later - greeted by flag bearers with flags from each of the 200 countries taking part in the London 2012 Games.

Cairnryan The flame arrived at the P&O ferry terminal in Cairnryan before travelling round Scotland

At 06:00 BST, the torch begins a 30-minute journey to the outskirts of Stranraer - taking in George Street, Charlotte Street, Port Rodie and Cairnryan Road.

Three bearers will carry it - Carol Harwood from Arran, Ross Mclelland from Ayr - and Doreen Bowie - principal of Stranraer's Wallace School of Dance - a woman described in her nomination as "truly inspirational".

From Stranraer, the flame is driven to Cairnryan before being carried through the village by two more local bearers.

Harry Waugh, 67, from New Luce - described as a community activist and inspirational athlete - is one of them.

Joining Mr Waugh in Cairnryan is Anne Barclay from Creetown, who organises Dumfries and Galloway's Cancer Research UK Race for Life.

More local people are involved as the torch goes up the coast.

Sally Murray from Stranraer carries it in Ballantrae, Stranraer scoutleader Alastair Campbell is a bearer in Girvan - as is Debs Millington of the Terally Bay Riding for the Disabled Group at Drummore.

The torch will end its first leg in Scotland on Friday, in Glasgow.

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