Kirkton water works reveal Roman artefacts at fort site

Floor tile A range of Roman artefacts have been uncovered during the water works in southern Scotland

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A series of Roman artefacts has been found during works to install a water main through a former fort site.

The discovery was made as work was carried out at Wellington Bridge near Kirkton in Dumfries and Galloway.

Archaeologists supervised the Scottish Water works through the site of the Carzield Roman Fort.

Items discovered included Roman tiles, clay fragments and pieces of cast iron metalwork which will now be taken for analysis and carbon dating.

John Atkinson, of GUARD Archaeology, said: "A series of archaeological features were uncovered during the work, which appear to correlate with the projected layout of Carzield Roman Fort as witnessed during previous investigations.

"These features included the remains of four separate areas of cobbled surface, three of which coincide with the position of a projected barrack block on the south-west edge of what would have been the main Roman road through the fort.

"The most north-westerly of the surfaces lay within what would have been the central area of the fort and appeared to be more refined in its construction.

"Below the surfaces there were two ditch features extending north-west and south-east."

'Sensitive site'

Further analysis should allow the origin of the artefacts to be better understood and allow "detailed insight" into life in the area during Roman times or possibly earlier.

Simon Brassey, a Scottish Water specialist engineer, said: "When working near sites like this we rely on the expertise of the archaeologists to assist us in causing minimum disruption to the sites while also keeping an eye out for any interesting items that may be uncovered.

"The work to date and study of the items is likely to take around six months.

"In the meantime we have managed to complete and commission a new water main successfully in a very sensitive site."

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