More older Scots will live alone, say new projections

Hand on stick The projections were partly put down to Scotland's ageing population

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Older people in Scotland will increasingly live alone over the next 25 years, according to the latest official projections.

National Records of Scotland said the figure for people aged 65 and over living alone could rise by a half.

It estimated the number of those aged 85 and over living on their own would double during the same time period.

Overall, the number of households in Scotland is expected to rise by a sixth to almost three million.

The figures stated:

  • Total households in Scotland projected to increase over the next 25 years to 2.78 million.
  • Nearly a quarter of people aged 16 or over are projected to be living alone by 2037, compared to about one in five in 2012.
  • In 2037, it is estimated there will be 46,100 men and 108,000 women aged 85 or above living alone in Scotland,
  • One-adult households are projected to increase by 300,000 over the next 25 years.
  • One-adult households with children are expected to rise by 41,000, with those containing just two adults increasing by 139,000.
  • Larger households is projected to fall by 84,000.

National Records of Scotland's chief executive, Tim Ellis, said: "The number of households in Scotland is projected to grow by nearly 400,000 over the next 25 years - most of this increase is in the older age groups.

"Scotland's population is growing, but the number of households is increasing faster, due to changes in the types of households people are living in, and the ageing population."

Most of Scotland's 32 local authority areas are expected to see the number of households go up, with the biggest increases predicted in Edinburgh (39%) and Aberdeen (35%).

Three council areas - North Ayrshire, Argyll and Bute and Inverclyde - are expect to see a fall in the number of households.

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