Scotland's referendum: Catching up with the class of '79

A class of primary school pupils talked politics to the BBC in 1979

In 1979 eight school pupils were interviewed by the BBC as part of a special programme on that year's Scottish devolution referendum.

We set out to track down the group, with your help. After seeing the footage, you told us the school was Mount Florida Primary on the southside of Glasgow and you named all eight children.

Six have spoken to the BBC again and a number were interviewed for a 1997 programme called "The Ghost of '79". Peter is the only one we know very little about, (we'd still love to hear from you Peter, so do get in touch).

Here is the class of '79.........

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Russell Speed

"I can't recall much of the day but the footage has cropped up a couple of times over the years. Grigor Milne was a good friend and John Milne, the BBC Scotland presenter who did the interview, is his dad. I'm sure it helped that I knew him before he interviewed us.

Russell Speed Russell Speed, how he was then and how he is today, said: "I am the one who is pouty and rolls his eyes."

"Seems like one or two of us had figured out that humour would get us screen time.

What did Russell say in 1979?

Interviewer: "When you're big, what do you want to be?"

Russell: "A tennis player."

Interviewer: "What do you know about Teddy Taylor?"

Russell: "That he's got a bald patch on the top of his head."

Interviewer: "Do you know what party he belongs to?"

Russell: *Very long pause*

Interviewer: "No?"

Russell: "...Labour?"

"Family and friends are envious of my childhood stardom. I'm told many of my expressions and mannerisms haven't changed.

"I was clearly ahead of my time, being Scottish and wanting to be a tennis champion. Growing up I was much better at table tennis.

"The Conservative offices were near our house in Mount Florida, so I should have known what party he [Teddy Taylor] was in. As others indicated on the film, he's the only Glasgow MP you would have recognised in the street.

"Devolution always felt like a stepping stone to independence.

"However, it's interesting that Donald Dewar was totally opposed to the idea. Living and working in London, I've mixed views.

"I'm sure the country can sustain itself economically and it would remove suspicion of Westminster's priorities.

"However, separatism doesn't feel like a particularly multi-cultural idea and Great Britain has its advantages, even if 'Dave Snooty' isn't one of them."

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  • How did the story unfold? Have a look at this Twitter timeline showing where we started and how you helped us in the writing of this piece.
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Grigor Milne
Grigor Milne Grigor in 1979 and as he appears today, working for CMS Cameron McKenna LLP

"It was my dad who ran it [the interview], so that was slightly bizarre, I have to say.

"I do remember a bit of coaching from my mum either the morning of the interview or the day before. It was an interesting day.

"And a bit embarrassing as well with my dad [John Milne] coming in to see all my class mates.

What did Grigor say in 1979?

Grigor: "We've been with the English too long."

Interviewer: "Why's that?"

Grigor: "Because I think we can manage fine ourselves."

"About a year after that interview, my family moved through to Edinburgh. So I was at secondary school at Edinburgh and then university at Edinburgh as well - I did law.

"I've basically worked for a law firm for 10 years in Edinburgh, Glasgow and London, which was where I was interviewed by the BBC for 'The Ghost of '79' in 1997.

"It's quite funny looking at that because you forget you were just talking about devolution in '79, so it was never the full real separation going on. It was just a case of having a bit more influence over what goes on up here.

"Personally and professionally you need to keep on top of these things [the referendum]. My views have probably mellowed a bit since '79 I guess.

"It's nice seeing what the rest of the class look like now and seeing what they're all up to. As I said, I left the school about a year after the interview, and apart from Russell who I saw a couple of times in Edinburgh because he was a student here as well, I've not really been able to keep up with any of them at all.

"So it's interesting to see where they've all ended up."

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Linda Paterson
Linda Paterson Linda, as a child and pictured again in 1997, said: "I was the one with the gap between her teeth you could drive a train through."

"My husband thinks it's hysterical. He does like to remind me that it was 1979 and he wasn't even born the year I was doing that, so that's quite embarrassing. I think everyone finds it quite funny that my hair looked as if my mother had been using tongs on it for about 20 years and that I was so politely spoken.

"I think someone said I was angelic.

What did Linda say in 1979?

Interviewer: "Do you not want to be a politician?"

Linda: "No."

Interviewer: "What would you like to be instead?"

Linda: "Hmm...a nurse."

Interviewer: "If we had a prime minister in Scotland, who would you like it to be?"

Linda: "Eh...Teddy Taylor.

"Marion was one of my best pals at school. And I used to chase Graeme [Atkins] about, I fancied him. He was my crush at primary school, I totally loved him, I was like 'oh my God!'.

"I haven't seen any of them since probably 1997 when we did the follow-up. I think we all kind of dispersed.

"All I knew was Teddy Taylor, I didn't even know what party he was in. His [Russell's] answer was classic, it's the eyes rolling back! I think I kind of went along with the flow, because we were on telly and this guy Teddy Taylor's name's been mentioned a few times, I think I'll just say him as well. I think I just liked the fact that his name was Teddy.

"No, I didn't become a nurse. I've got a complete phobia of anything medical. I've been in financial services since 1997, although I've recently been made redundant so I'm now training to be a driving instructor.

"I'm definitely a 'Yes' person, was in 1997 so I've not changed my views on that. Whether that's the right thing or not, I don't know."

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Graeme Atkins
Graeme Atkins Graeme, in 1979 and as he is today, says: "I'm the one with the two front teeth that Buggs Bunny would be proud of."

"Prior to the day itself we had all been given the choice as to whether we wanted to participate or not. I had been happy to opt in but then got quite worked up about it the night before and wanted to pull out.

"My parents talked me round and, in the end, I absolutely loved it. It was all very exciting and lots of fun.

What did Graeme say in 1979?

Interviewer: "Who would you like to be Scotland's prime minister?"

Graeme: "Teddy Taylor."

Interviewer: "Why?"

Graeme: "Because he's the only one I know."

"Immediate family and a few friends have seen it so far. It prompted some nice reminiscing.

"I particularly remember Peter's comment about wanting more sweet shops to open, and Russell's description of Teddy Taylor. He was the local MP at the time and was pretty well known, even to nine-year-olds, although that was probably largely due to him being called Teddy.

"That's my excuse anyway for saying I wanted him as prime minister.

"I have actually seen the clip since it was originally broadcast. It was the days before video recorders were common so my Dad cine-filmed the TV as the programme went out. It was exciting to watch afterwards, although it did lack something without sound.

"After Mount Florida Primary it was off to King's Park Secondary then onto Strathclyde University. I moved to England in 1992, worked in industry for a couple for years, then went into teaching, becoming a head teacher in 2009. I've been living in London since 1997 but will be relocating to Northumberland in the summer.

"I'm married now with one son of 22 months and number two is on the way.

"Regarding the referendum, I am watching proceedings with interest despite being unable to vote. I'm not unduly concerned about this as I don't have a particularly strong view either way. What will be will be."

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Norma Hutton
Norma Norma, as she was in 1979 and as she is today, says: "I am the one with the big eyes looking for the escape route"

"I found the experience of the interview very daunting, I had opinions but always believed I had nothing constructive to say and maybe had a little stage fright.

What did Norma say in 1979?

Interviewer: "What do you know about devolution?"

Norma: "Nothing really."

Interviewer: "Have you heard about it at all?"

Norma: *Long pause* "Yes? I think."

"I went onto Kings Park Secondary School but moved away from Glasgow approximately 23 years ago and I now live in Christchurch, Dorset. I am currently working for Bournemouth Borough Council.

"I like bestowing my culinary skills on others and would have preferred to have had the opportunity of running a restaurant or bed and breakfast, cooking and just simply making a small difference to people's outlook.

"I got married to Quintin, whom I met in 1996. We don't have any children, only our cat - Tinkerbell.

"Scotland has grown since 1979 and although not independent has devolved power and control over some of its affairs through an elected parliament which I believe is gradually increasing.

"There are so many changes to be made if the majority vote 'Yes'. What will they be saying 'Yes' to? Without even considering the bigger picture the day-to-day aspect could have a devastating consequence on Scotland's economy.

"I do wish that I had the option of voting, in order to make the right decision, one should have all the facts for and against. I would prefer Scotland to have more devolved power, standing on its own but still part of Britain."

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Marion Carpenter
Marion Wickes Marion Carpenter, as a school girl in 1979 and in 1997, says she was: "The goody two-shoes with the pigtails."

"Do you know what, it's absolutely dreadful I cannot remember the day itself at all. I looked at it last night online and that's the first time I've ever seen it.

What did Marion say in 1979?

Marion: "They want to do things by themselves."

Interviewer: "Do you think that's a good thing?"

Marion: "Yes."

Interviewer: "Would you like to be in the assembly when you grow up?"

Marion: "No."

Interviewer: "Why not?"

Marion: "I don't know."

Interviewer: "What would you like to be instead?"

Marion: "A nurse."

Interviewer: "If we had a Prime Minister in Scotland, who would you like it to be?"

Marion: *Long pause* "My Dad?"

"We moved abroad within a year of that programme being made, to Saudi Arabia, as my father was a doctor, and that rather eclipsed my childhood memories of time at Mount Florida Primary School.

"I sort of remember not knowing very much about what was going on in the wider world, being quite naïve, so when I made that line when they asked who I wanted to be Prime Minister - and I said my dad - that was purely because all the other children had said exactly the same, and I was very thrown and didn't want to give the same answer as them. He was the only other man I could think of.

"The '97 programme was really nice actually. It would be nice to see them all again.

"Well, I hope I know a little more about politics than I did in 1979. In 1997, I was probably the lone voice that was anti-devolution. I was proved wrong on that one so what do I know?

"Now I'm a bit ambivalent about independence. Obviously I now live in Dorset, so I have a slightly different view. I can't see the need for it. It's often couched in a sort of anti-English ethos and if I felt like that I wouldn't be living in England and married to an Englishman, so I don't have that vociferous view, parochial view, where I feel it needs to be independent.

"And I'm slightly intrigued to see how the practicalities will pan out - in terms of passports, and borders, and that kind of thing.

"I would like a vote. I do find that really frustrating."

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David Ferguson
David Ferguson David Ferguson appeared in the 1997 programme 'The Ghost of '79'

When David was interviewed in 1979 he was asked if he wanted to be a politician, serving in a Scottish assembly. He gave a blunt "no", adding that he wanted to be a policeman instead.

The BBC caught up with the Glasgow school pupil in 1997, ahead of the Scottish devolution referendum of that year.

At the time David said: "I think we should give it [devolution] a try, see what happens. The only thing that worries me is if it doesn't work, what would happen then? We'd be stuck with an assembly that isn't working. That's my only real worry about it."

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Peter
Peter Vail The BBC spoke to Peter in 1979, and he hasn't been on camera since

In 1979, schoolboy Peter's contribution to the political debate was that Scotland needed more sweet shops. Did the politicians of the time make his wish come true? Get in touch Peter and let us know......

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Scotland Decides: SCOTLAND VOTES NO

  1. No 2,001,926
  2. Yes 1,617,989
After 32 of 32 counts Results in detail

Referendum Live

  1.  
    Email: haveyoursay@bbc.co.uk 12:25: Get involved

    Maurice Pannell: For heaven's sake give Westminster a chance to honour its commitments before starting to use words like "renege" Mr Salmond. The vote was only final on Friday morning and a clear timetable laid out. MPs should be judged by what happens over the next few months.

    Paul Clark: What other true country would choose not to be an independent nation? It's simply mind blowing that Scotland should vote no. This sends a message to the rest of the world that we are an unambitious people only concerned with the here and now. A nation who would choose to be ruled rather than rule ourselves and shape our own destiny and that of our children. What has happened to the free thinkers, the pioneers of the modern world, the brave, intellectual, forward looking Scots that we are regarded throughout the world to be?

    David Copping: I don't think Nicola Sturgeon would make a good leader of the SNP. She is too closely identified with losing the referendum. Scotland needs someone new who will unite the country and go forward as a full member of the United Kingdom.

     
  2.  
    12:19: 'Disgraceful' Cameron

    Shadow business secretary Chuka Umunna accused Mr Cameron of behaving in a "disgraceful" way over his response to the referendum.

    He told BBC Radio 5 Live's Pienaar's Politics: "What you are seeing is the Prime Minister here behaving in a dishonourable way and in bad faith, because he has been seeking to link English votes for English MPs to the issue of Scottish devolution and what was agreed before the referendum.

    "There was no mention of tying that - English votes for English MPs - to the reforms that we need to look at that have been agreed in Scotland."

    He added: "We have just seen the Scottish people vote to maintain this wonderful, successful union that we have got, maintain the solidarity and togetherness that we have, and all the Prime Minister now wants to talk about is separating out different parts of our country, setting them up against each other."

    Dismissing Mr Cameron's "back of the fag packet" approach he added: "I think the way he has behaved has been disgraceful."

     
  3.  
    12:12: Labour crisis?

    Asked on Sunday Politics Scotland if Labour was in crisis following the independence referendum, with many Labour supporters voting Yes, Shadow Foreign Secretary Douglas Alexander dismissed the suggestion.

    He highlighted how the majority of people in traditional SNP areas such as Moray and Perth and Kinross voted No. He also accepted Labour had "work to do".

     
  4.  
    Email: haveyoursay@bbc.co.uk 12:05: Have your say

    Nick: As an Englishman I secretly hoped Scotland would remain part of the United kingdom as I genuinely see us all as one multifaceted family. However, I think Alex Salmond is the modern day William Wallace and so admired his clear love and passion for the Scottish people. I was saddened to see him step down as First Minister and hope it is not a kneejerk reaction that he will regret in years to come. He is a great politician - use his talents, find him a job.

     
  5.  
    12:00: Sturgeon announcement imminent?

    SNP MSP Jamie Hepburn tweets: Looking forward to announcement from @NicolaSturgeon for leadership of @theSNP. She is going to be an outstanding First Minister for Scotland.

     
  6.  
    11:57: Kirk service

    These are notable excerpts from Right Reverend John Chalmers' sermon at the service for reconciliation in Edinburgh.

    "Today and in the weeks to come Scotland needs magnanimity all round and it needs a process for shaping our future which allows every voice, (the 45% as well as the 55%) not just to be heard but to be listened to. This process has engaged those who have otherwise been disengaged and we cannot allow that engagement to evaporate.

    "Today in Scotland, those who may be feeling let down, bereft, anxious, angry - need to find that on the other side there are those who are prepared to be magnanimous, generous and inclusive in their approach to what happens next. And although it is not possible for the result to be reversed so that the first shall be last and the last shall first - there is an imperative that we make the last feel like they are first."

     
  7.  
    11:54: Kirk service Vanessa Barford BBC News Magazine

    Elizabeth McClelland, an elder at St Giles, believes the service is an "extremely good idea".

    Elizabeth McClelland

    Ms McClelland said: "We want to acknowledge a huge feeling of unease. Everyone is waiting to see if the government fulfils its vows and it's creating tension - but the whole of Scotland should be proud."

     
  8.  
    11:53: Kirk service Vanessa Barford BBC News Magazine

    Outside the historic cathedral, situated between Edinburgh Castle and Holyrood Palace on the Royal Mile at the heart of the city, there are still signs of the schisms of the past few weeks.

    "Yes" chalk message

    "Yes" is emblazoned across the statue of influential Scottish economist and philosopher Adam Smith. The cathedral is also marked with a few messages of "Yes", though some may argue with respect - written in chalk that can easily be wiped away.

     
  9.  
    11:50: Kirk service Vanessa Barford BBC News Magazine

    On a warm, sunny morning in Edinburgh, the bells of St Giles's Cathedral are ringing with optimism.

    St Giles's Cathedral

    The Kirk wants this service - which it says isn't just for Scotland's capital city but the whole nation - to be a message of unity and to help heal the divisions of the referendum by reminding the congregation of their "shared values" and "common purpose".

    More than 1,000 people are expected to fill the aisles and stretch out their hand of friendship to fellow Scots who did not support the same side in the service.

    Shadow foreign secretary Douglas Alexander and Scotland's Finance Secretary John Swinney will each give a reading.

     
  10.  
    11:49: The irony of victory?

    The outgoing First Minister said: "One of the ironies that is developing so quickly after the referendum might be that those who lost on Thursday - the Yes side - end up as the political winners, and those who won end up as the losers."

     
  11.  
    11:46: Salmond book

    Mr Salmond also said on the BBC's Sunday Politics Show that he is going to write a book entitled '100 days' which will be coming out before Christmas. In it, he said he may reveal the things he would have changed about the Yes campaign.

     
  12.  
    11:43: Kirk service

    Senior politicians from both sides in the Scottish independence campaign, including Scottish Secretary Alistair Carmichael, are at a service of reconciliation at St Giles Cathedral in Edinburgh.

    Alistair Carmichael
     
  13.  
    11:37: Salmond on moving forward

    "This is, for the SNP, a very favourable political time. My concern is the opportunity for Scotland and how that can be moved foward."

     
  14.  
    11:34: More Salmond

    Alex Salmond to Sunday Politics: "I've been leader of the party for 20 of the last 24 years and I think it's time to give someone else a shot."

     
  15.  
    11:29: 'Swift movement'

    Scottish Secretary Alistair Carmichael insisted that the English issue would not be allowed to derail progress on the delivery of extra powers to Holyrood.

    He told Pienaar's Politics there was a "popular mood" to discuss the status of English and Scottish MPs but added: "It's good that we can have this wider conversation but that does not act as any sort of brake or hindrance on our meeting the timetable that we have previously given an undertaking on."

    The Liberal Democrat UK government minister said the Tory plan to link the two matters was an attempt to encourage swift movement on reform across the UK.

    "But if that agreement is not achievable then we still keep to the work in the Scottish Parliament and the work of Lord Smith," he said.

     
  16.  
    11:25: Salmond on reasons for resigning

    Mr Salmond added: "I am not really an agoniser. I take a look at things. When you get beaten in an election or referendum, then you have to consider standing down as a real possibility.

    "I know taking responsibility in politics has gone out of fashion but there is aspect to which if you lead a campaign and you don't win, then you have to contemplate whether you are the best person to lead future political campaigns and in my judgement it was time for the SNP and the broader yes movement would benefit from new leadership."

     
  17.  
    11:20: Salmond on the referendum

    First Minister Alex Salmond tells the BBC's Sunday Politics Show: "For most of the referendum I thought we would win."

    Alex Salmond
     
  18.  
    11:10: Love-bomb

    The Scotsman's Deputy Editor Kenny Farquharson tweets: Depressing conversation with English relative this morning. They think we hate them. Let the love bombing of the English commence. #indyref

     
  19.  
    Email: haveyoursay@bbc.co.uk 11:02: Get involved

    Keith: I hope that what I am hearing is not true. The three main parties promised the Scottish people that they would get new powers if they voted No in the referendum. Now that the poll is over and the vote to go independent was No, the English politicians can't seem to agree exactly what benefits they are going to give to the Scottish people.

    I hope they are not going back on their promise. I am English, but I feel that a promise is a promise.

    No wonder nobody trusts any politicians.

     
  20.  
    10:54: 'Yes Alliance'

    The Sunday Herald's Investigations Editor Paul Hutcheon has said three senior SNP MSPs have proposed they fight the next general election together with the Scottish Green Party and Scottish Socialist Party.

    Mr Hutcheon writes: "Leaked emails reveal that three Nationalist MSPs, including an aide to the outgoing First Minister, would like to contest May's Westminster poll as either a "Yes Alliance" or a "Scotland Alliance"."

     
  21.  
    10:46: Sturgeon's Deputy? Glenn Campbell BBC Scotland news

    Back in 2004, Alex Salmond and Nicola Sturgeon stood on what was seen as a joint ticket although the election for SNP leader and deputy leader are separate votes. You don't buy one and get one free.

    It is not clear if Ms Sturgeon - assuming that she declares herself a candidate in the next few days - if she will choose to run with a deputy leadership contender or allow there to be a contest and work with whoever wins that contest.

    Among the people whose names are most often mentioned, the External Affairs Minister Humza Yousaf, the Local Government Minister Derek Mackay, Richard Lochhead, Shona Robison, Angela Constance have been suggested by some. Nobody declared so far, and I don't think that contest will really get under way until the leadership process becomes clearer.

     
  22.  
    10:39: Lord Salmond? Ross Hawkins Political correspondent, BBC News

    The rocks would melt with the sun before I'd ever set foot in the House of Lords, Alex Salmond tells Sky

     
  23.  
    10:37: 'Yes' voters in Labour

    Ed Miliband said: "I know we've got a big job to do, to reach out to those people who voted Yes who are Labour voters.

    "We're going to show that we're going to make a difference. It's people on low and middle incomes who don't think their hard work is being rewarded and we are going to change that."

     
  24.  
    10:35: What about Gordon Brown?

    Asked if Gordon Brown was likely to ask him for a job, Labour leader Ed Miliband told the Andrew Marr Show: "I don't think that's going to happen. He played an important role in the referendum but he's not going to come back to front-line politics in Britain."

     
  25.  
    10:33: 'Parties agree'

    "I think the parties are, by in large, in agreement on a lot of things," says Lord Smith of Kelvin, the man tasked with bringing more devolved powers to Scotland.

    "I've just come off the Commonwealth Games and people said that might not have gone quite so well. I enjoy a challenge."

     
  26.  
    10:31: SNP membership rise

    The SNP's chief executive Peter Murrell confirms that more than 8,000 people have signed up to join the Scottish National Party since the independence referendum vote.

    There has also been an increase in Scottish Green Party membership with more than 2,000 new joiners.

     
  27.  
    10:29: 'Darling's decision'

    Ed Miliband on Alistair Darling's future: "I think he played an incredibly important role in the referendum. He's a very strong member of Labour's team but he's got to make his own decision about what he wants to do."

     
  28.  
    10:28: Lord Smith's plan

    Lord Smith of Kelvin, the man tasked with overseeing the process of bringing more devolved powers to Scotland, has told BBC Radio Scotland his task it to get the energy from the millions of Scots who voted and "transfer it into action now".

    He said: "First of all, I will be speaking to all the political parties. Secondly, I am going to reach out to the institutions - the trade unions, voluntary groups. I want to get back to them and say 'tell me again what exactly you think should change here to make life better'.

    "Thirdly, I want to reach out to the people of Scotland who may not be involved in these institutions , may not be involved in these political parties.

    lord smith

    "4.2m people means most of the people in Scotland were involved in this and I want to hear from them, so I am going to try and find a way to reach out and get feedback from all of them."

    Who is Lord Smith? Read our profile here.

     
  29.  
    10:25: Young voters

    Ed Miliband said, under Labour, 16 and 17-year-olds would be able to vote in general elections - just as they did in the Scottish referendum.

    He said: "We can't go back on this now. It wasn't our original proposal to have 16 and 17-year-olds vote in this referendum but I'm glad it happened.

    "I was on the campaign trail in Scotland talking to young people who were making very sensible thoughts about the future."

     
  30.  
    10:22: Swinney backs Sturgeon James Cook Scotland Correspondent, BBC News

    John Swinney also tells BBC Radio Scotland: "I will be backing Nicola Sturgeon for leader, enthusiastically and energetically."

     
  31.  
    10:19: Swinney on further powers James Cook Scotland Correspondent, BBC News

    Scotland's finance secretary John Swinney suggests the SNP will argue for devolution of all powers except defence and foreign affairs, during talks on Scotland's future. He says if the UK parties "don't honour in full their commitments" then "No" voters will believe they were "utterly deceived".

     
  32.  
    10:17: Cameron statement

    Prime Minister David Cameron has posted a Facebook status outlining exactly why he believes the rest of the UK must have the same powers due for Scotland.

    Mr Cameron writes: "But this moment must not just be about securing Scotland's future in the UK - and celebrating that fact - but settling other questions whose time has come.

    "The challenge is to make sure our UK works for all nations. Millions of people in the rest of the UK have been listening to these debates, watching this campaign and rightly asking: 'What will change for us? Why can't we have the same powers and the same rights as those in Scotland?'

    "These are questions the Conservative Party itself has been asking for a long time."

     
  33.  
    10:15: One the Barnett formula

    When asked if the Barnett formula, which calculates the budget given to Scotland, is unjust, Mr Miliband said: "The Barnett Formula has served us well and should continue because it is oriented towards need. For example, Scotland has more older people and there is a greater need.

    "But there is a big injustice here, which is the way public spending is apportioned in England. There are huge issues about what the government has done to the poorer areas of this country."

     
  34.  
    10:14: Salmond tribute

    Kevin Pringle, SNP strategic communications director and former special advisor to Alex Salmond, has penned a tribute to the first minister in the Sunday Post.

    Mr Pringle writes: "He entered public life because he has a positive vision for the future of Scotland. And his instinct in every situation is to work with others in the best interests of Scotland who may not share that vision."

     
  35.  
    10:10: Sturgeon the clear favourite Glenn Campbell BBC Scotland news

    I think either a coronation or a contest for the new SNP leader is possible but at this moment in time it seems to me a coronation is more likely.

    While there are some in the party that think a contest would be desirable as that is the democratic way and it would confer legitimacy on whomever becomes the leader, no-one really seriously thinks anyone other than Nicola Sturgeon would win a contest so some are asking 'what's the point?'

    Some of the other big names who might fancy their chances are ruling themselves out.

     
  36.  
    10:08: 'Two-tier parliament'

    The Labour leader said he is not in favour of a separate English parliament with an extra tier of English MPS.

    He said: "I am in favour of one House of Commons with 650 MPs because we've fought tooth-and-nail over the last two years to avoid our parliament being split up."

     
  37.  
    10:06: 'Losing Scottish votes'

    Ed Miliband has denied losing the votes of Scottish MPs could cost Labour a future majority at Westminster. He told the Andrew Marr show: "The history is that when Labour have won majorities in the United Kingdom, we've won majorities in England too."

     
  38.  
    10:02: English votes

    Ed Miliband on the row over English votes for English laws: "We've spent two years trying to keep our country together. Let's have a proper constitutional convention, let's look at the issues, but let's not drive our country apart."

     
  39.  
    Tweet @BBCScotlandnews 09:59: Get involved

    @testedbylife tweets: #Miliband on #Marr Not his, Miliband, best performance. Unfortunate start to a critical 6 months

    @BrynTeilo tweets: #Miliband wants to preserve the #Westminster parliament as is. That sums him up.

     
  40.  
    09:57: Miliband on Cameron

    "People right across the country are going to say David Cameron made a promise, he didn't make a conditional promise, and he's going to be kept to that."

     
  41.  
    09:54: People say 'it's not working'

    Ed Miliband tells Andrew Marr: "I was in Paisley and met a Yes voter, a woman pushing a pram, who said 'I can't get a house, I want to get out of the United Kingdom'.

    "It tells you something very deep. It's people saying this country doesn't work for me."

     
  42.  
    09:53: Votes at 16 and 17

    Ed Miliband says there is "no case" to deny 16 and 17-year-olds the vote in future elections

     
  43.  
    09:51: 'Wake-up call'

    Labour leader Ed Miliband told the Marr show: "Unless the establishment reacts to this wake-up call about how our country is run, how our economy is run, we are not going to address the discontent in England, Wales, Scotland and the whole of the United Kingdom."

     
  44.  
    09:48: 'Clear promise'

    Ed Miliband tells Andrew Marr: "He made a clear promise. And I know that David Cameron will want to honour that promise."

     
  45.  
    09:45: Salmond's 'place in history'

    On Alex Salmond retiring, Alistair Darling told the Andrew Marr show: "He is a very formidable politician. He has brought his party from the fringes and he's got them into government.

    "He is a divisive politician, that's the nature of the beast. But Alex Salmond has got his place in history. I'm sure that's what he wanted and that's what he'll get."

     
  46.  
    09:42: 'We will deliver'

    Ed Miliband tells The Andrew Marr Show: "No ifs, no buts, we will deliver on our promise."

    Ed Miliband
     
  47.  
    09:39: Miliband's worry David Porter Westminster correspondent

    Traditionally, Labour MPs have been the majority MPs in Scotland. At the moment, there are 41 Labour MPs out of the 58 MPs in Scotland. That is a very big block of MPs that Ed Miliband, if he became Prime Minister after the May General Election next year, would have to rely on. He would have to rely on those MPs to get through reforms on health and education in England.

    The argument from the Conservatives is the West Lothian question. Simply, why should MPs in Scotland whose decisions on health and education are taken in Holyrood, why should they be able to vote on those matters in England, which don't affect them? This is potentially becoming a real flashpoint between the parties.

     
  48.  
    09:37: 'Clear commitment'

    Alistair Darling adds: "I spoke to David Cameron and Ed Miliband on Friday morning and I'm absolutely clear that we've got a commitment (to more devolution for Scotland). The debate in Scotland is more advanced and developed than it is in the UK because we've had a referendum campaign.

    "If anyone attempts to get out of that, how will anyone be believed on what they've got to say?"

     
  49.  
    09:35: 'Non-negotiable'

    Alistair Darling told the Andrew Marr programme: "The agreement reached by the three parties, as far as I'm concerned, is non-negotiable. It was promised, it's got to be delivered and anyone who welches on that is going to pay a very, very heavy price for years to come."

     
  50.  
    09:32: Darling vow on Union pledge

    Better Together leader Alistair Darling has said he fully expects the pro-Union parties to carry out their pledge to give more devolution powers to Scotland.

    alistair darling

    Speaking on the BBC's Andrew Marr show, Mr Darling said: "The vast majority of people expect us all to work together for the common good."

     
  51.  
    09:30: Analysis David Porter Westminster correspondent

    I think what we saw yesterday from Gordon Brown was a pretty heavy shove from a former Prime Minister saying to the three UK party leaders - David Cameron, Ed Miliband and Nick Clegg - 'just a week ago, you signed up to this pledge, you said it was going to happen. Make sure that it does or Scotland will not forgive you'.

    As regards the division, what we are seeing now is just how complicated, how thorny a question constitutional reform is not just in Scotland but for the rest of the UK.

     
  52.  
    09:26: Another referendum

    Former Deputy Chairman of the Conservative Party Lord Ashcroft tweets: If the Westminster parties do not deliver on the "vow" made to the Scots in the #indyref then expect siren calls for another referendum.

     
  53.  
    09:21: 'No ifs, no buts'

    Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg, writing in The Sunday Times, insisted there could be "no ifs, no buts" about delivering the extra powers promised to Scotland, and the package "cannot be made contingent on other constitutional reforms".

    He accused the Tories of being more concerned with the threat from Ukip than the vow made to Scotland.

    Mr Clegg said: "The Conservatives, in their rush to protect themselves from an attack from the right, are only concerned about English votes on English matters.

    "Of course we need a solution to this dilemma but, by appearing to link it to the delivery of further devolution to Scotland, they risk reneging on the commitment made to the Scottish people that, in the event of a No vote, new powers would come what may.

    "Worse still, if the Conservatives enter into a Dutch auction with Ukip over ever more extreme solutions to the issue of English votes they could jeopardise the union they purport to defend.

    "Surely we haven't fought to save our union in a vote north of the border, only to see it balkanised in Westminster?"

     
  54.  
    09:18: 'Travesty of democracy'

    UK government Justice Secretary Chris Grayling, writing in The Sunday Telegraph, said Holyrood should not receive more powers while Scottish MPs can still "shape the destiny" of the NHS, education and justice systems south of the border and force "socialist policies" on England.

    "That would be a travesty of democracy, and would be regarded with fury by the English," he said.

     
  55.  
    09:16: Shapps says 'no reneging'

    Tory chairman Grant Shapps told BBC 5 Live the devolution vow would be honoured by the Westminster parties but accused Labour leader Ed Miliband of "weak leadership".

    He said: "What we think is, actually, it's absolutely right more powers go to Scotland, that's clearly what was promised in the referendum if there was a No vote.

    "There's no reneging on that at all, that is what's going to happen.

    "At the same time, we need to sort out what happens for England, and let's face it the rest of the United Kingdom is 60 million people on top of the five million in Scotland. The rest of the United Kingdom, therefore, has to have a fair settlement as well."

    He added: "We need to make sure that there are English laws voted on by English MPs. It's pretty straightforward, it's not really very complicated."

    He said Mr Miliband "doesn't want to sort the problem out" and his proposed constitutional convention starting next year is a "complete joke".

     
  56.  
    09:13: Nicola Sturgeon's story

    With Deputy First Minister Nicola Sturgeon the hot favourite to replace Alex Salmond as SNP leader, you can read all about her journey to the top here.

    Nicola Sturgeon
     
  57.  
    09:08: Leaders' pledge

    The Sunday Post also features the referendum on its front page, with the pledge by Ed Miliband, David Cameron and Nick Clegg to meet their target for more devolved powers.

    Sunday Post
     
  58.  
    09:05: The Motion

    Here is the text of the motion on further powers that will be put before the UK Parliament tomorrow:

    That this House...

    • welcomes the result of the Scottish independence referendum and the decision of the people of Scotland to remain part of the United Kingdom;
    • recognises that people across Scotland voted‎ for a Union based on the pooling and sharing of resources and for the‎ continuation of devolution inside the United Kingdom;
    • notes the statement by the prime minister, deputy prime minister and leader of the opposition regarding the guarantee of and timetable for further devolution to Scotland;
    • calls on the government to lay before Parliament a Command Paper including the proposals of all three UK political parties by 30th October and to consult widely with the Scottish people, civic Scotland and the Scottish Parliament on these proposals;
    • further calls on the government to publish heads of agreement by the end of November and draft clauses for the new Scotland Bill by the end of January 2015.
     
  59.  
    08:57: Reconciliation

    The Right Reverend John Chalmers said today's service in Edinburgh "is not just a photo opportunity".

    He said: "It is a real serious opportunity to look inside ourselves and commit to togetherness.

    "There were times when people said we wouldn't need any activity to bring people together. 'Scots will fix that overnight'. I don't think that is true for a lot of people."

    Mr Chalmers told Radio Scotland the church could be part of a process to help reconciliation.

     
  60.  
    08:54: Yousaf not running

    SNP minister Humza Yousaf tweets: For all journalists that are still calling about leadership let me be clear: No ifs, no buts, no mibbees - I am #TeamSturgeon

     
  61.  
    08:51: The Aftermath

    Scotland on Sunday features stories about Nicola Sturgeon's leadership chances and disorder in George Square.

    Scotland on Sunday
     
  62.  
    Text 80295 08:48: Get involved

    Barry, Blantyre: Does anyone really believe the Westminster establishment will give a toss about Scotland now the turkeys have voted for Christmas?

    Margaret, Dundee: Tell A Salmond to be quiet. He lost. The people of Scotland gave him a bloody nose. He promised Nirvana which he could NEVER have delivered, so his pot has a nerve calling the kettle black. He's a lame duck now, resigning when he did to spoil the news of a no vote and you lot fell for it! DON'T give him the oxygen of publicity. He's yesterday's man.

     
  63.  
    08:46: The Vow

    Today's front page of The Scottish Sun on Sunday features the story of former Prime Minister Gordon Brown urging all of the Westminster parties to meet their vow for additional powers for the Scottish Parliament.

    Scottish Sun
     
  64.  
    08:44: Momentous times

    After a historic week in Scotland, the Sunday Mail aims to reflect that on its front page.

    Sunday Mail
     
  65.  
    08:40: 'Contrasting emotions'

    Right Reverend John Chalmers, the Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, will lead a service this morning at St Giles' Cathedral in Edinburgh with leading members of the Yes and No camps in attendance.

    Speaking on Radio Scotland, he said: "We need a variety of events to bring people together to unite in common purpose.

    "The word I have heard a lot of people use is gutted on one side. On the other side, there are people who are possibly relieved if not elated.

    "Across Scotland and in different ways, people need to find opportunities to deal with those contrasting emotions."

     
  66.  
    08:30: Miliband interviews

    Ed Miliband will be speaking on The Andrew Marr Show from the Labour party conference in Manchester. However, the BBC's political editor in the South of England, Peter Henley, is reporting that the Labour leader has cancelled other BBC interviews.

    Peter Henley: Ed Miliband has pulled out of planned BBC interviews tomorrow. They've cancelled BBC English Regions, Scotland, NI & Wales.

     
  67.  
    08:27: Sunday Herald

    The Sunday Herald has a wraparound front cover.

    The paper says: "We are proud to be the newspaper that gave voice to 45% of the Scottish population. A big responsibility and huge honour."

    sunday herald

     
  68.  
    08:17: Darling says promise 'non-negotiable'

    Alistair Darling, who led the Better Together campaign, insisted the pledge for more powers would be acted upon within the stated timetable.

    Speaking to the BBC's Andrew Marr programme in an interview to be broadcast later, he said: "The agreement reached between the three parties is non-negotiable."

    "It was promised, it's got to be delivered, and anyone who welches on that will pay a very heavy price for years to come."

     
  69.  
    08:11: Sturgeon favourite

    Half the Scottish cabinet have publicly backed Alex Salmond's deputy, Nicola Sturgeon, to replace him as SNP leader and first minister.

    Ms Sturgeon has yet to formally throw her hat into the ring.

    Nicola Sturgeon

    But on Friday she said she could think of "no greater privilege" than to seek the leadership.

    Pundits and bookmakers have already tipped her as the clear favourite, although as yet there are no declared challengers.

     
  70.  
    08:04: Watch Salmond clip
    Alex Salmond

    In the interview recorded for the Sunday Politics, Mr Salmond said the pledge made by David Cameron, Ed Miliband and Nick Clegg had been "cooked up in desperation".

    You can watch the full interview on Sunday Politics on 21 September 2014 at 11:00 BST on BBC One.

     
  71.  
    08:02: Salmond quotes

    Mr Salmond said: "I am actually not surprised they are cavilling and reneging on commitments, I am only surprised by the speed at which they are doing it. They seem to be totally shameless in these matters.

    "The prime minister wants to link change in Scotland to change in England. He wants to do that because he has difficulty in carrying his backbenchers on this and they are under pressure from UKIP.

    "The Labour leadership of course are frightened of any changes in England which leave them without a majority in the House of Commons on English matters.

    "I think the vow was something cooked up in desperation for the last few days of the campaign and I think everyone in Scotland now realises that".

     
  72.  
    08:00: Salmond on the Vow

    Mr Salmond was speaking to the BBC's Sunday Politics programme, which will be broadcast on BBC One at 11:00.

    The first minister said he believed the late vow of new powers made by the leaders of the three main UK parties had won the referendum for the "No" side.

    But he predicted "No" voters would already be angry at having been "misled", "gulled" and "tricked" by the pledge.

     
  73.  
    07:56: Salmond hits out

    Scotland's First Minister Alex Salmond says he is surprised at the speed with which Britain's main political parties are reneging on commitments to Scotland, following a vote against Scottish independence. He told the BBC that many voters would feel misled. The British government has denied that a timetable for giving Scotland more powers will slip.

     
  74.  
    07:52: Sunday live Steven Brocklehurst BBC Scotland news website

    Good morning and welcome to today's live page coverage of the latest post-referendum news and analysis.

     

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