Scottish independence: One million Scots urged to sign 'yes' declaration

 

Supporters launch the 'Yes' campaign for Scottish independence

The "yes" campaign for independence wants one million Scots to sign a declaration of support by the time of the referendum in the autumn of 2014.

Scotland's First Minister Alex Salmond said independence would happen if that milestone was achieved.

The pledge was made at the launch of the Yes Scotland campaign in Edinburgh.

However, pro-union supporters believe independence remains largely unpopular among the Scottish electorate and will not happen.

The Scottish National Party played a leading role in the campaign, which was launched at Cineworld in Edinburgh and included other parties, celebrities and businesses.

What does the Yes Declaration say?

"I believe that it is fundamentally better for us all if decisions about Scotland's future are taken by the people who care most about Scotland, that is, by the people of Scotland.

"Being independent means Scotland's future will be in Scotland's hands.

"There is no doubt that Scotland has great potential. We are blessed with talent, resources and creativity. We have the opportunity to make our nation a better place to live, for this and future generations. We can build a greener, fairer and more prosperous society that is stronger and more successful than it is today.

"I want a Scotland that speaks with her own voice and makes her own unique contribution to the world - a Scotland that stands alongside the other nations on these isles, as an independent nation."

A pro-union campaign is expected to launch later this year.

Mr Salmond said: "We unite behind a declaration of self-evident truth.

"The people who live in Scotland are best placed to make the decisions that affect Scotland.

"We want a Scotland that's greener, that's fairer and more prosperous.

"We realise that the power of an independent Scotland is necessary to achieve these great ends."

Some of the people who pledged their public support for the campaign did so for the first time.

Actor Alan Cumming, who has been based largely in the US, tweeted after the launch that he would "becoming a resident of Scotland again in order to vote in 2014".

Other "yes" backers included:

  • actor Sir Sean Connery
  • former BBC Scotland head of news Blair Jenkins
  • poet Liz Lochead
  • musician Pat Kane
  • actor Brian Cox.

Mr Salmond told the gathered media: "I want Scotland to be independent not because I think we are better than any other country, but because I know we're as good as any other country.

Start Quote

It was left to Liz Lochhead, Scotland's Makar, to recall from one of her finest plays that the Scots national pastime is frequently "nostalgia"”

End Quote

"Like these other nations, our future, our resources, our success should be in our own hands."

The campaign will be built "brick by brick" across communities, he said.

Mr Salmond said that the case would be taken to the people by community activism and "online wizardry".

He added: "By the time we enter the referendum campaign in autumn 2014, our intention is to have one million Scots who have signed the independence for Scotland declaration.

"Friends, if we achieve that, then we shall win an independent Scotland."

Mr Salmond was supported at the launch, which was hosted by Greenock actor Martin Compston, by Scottish Green Party co-leader Patrick Harvie.

He told the 500-strong gathering: "Greens are not nationalists. In fact, we are probably more comfortable than most parties in acknowledging the range of views that exist in our membership and our voters about the question of independence.

"But I believe, as most of us do, that the range of powers currently still held at Westminster simply make no sense from a Green perspective.

What's known at the moment

SNP position Unionist position

Wants the referendum in the autumn of 2014

Wants the referendum "sooner rather than later"

Backs a "yes/no" ballot but is open minded on including a second "devo max" question

Wants a one question "yes/no" ballot

Wants 16 and 17-year-olds to be able to vote in the referendum

Backs the status quo with 18 and over able to vote

Has agreed to the Electoral Commission overseeing the vote

Wanted the Electoral Commission to oversee the vote

"I certainly look forward to helping develop a clear and compelling case for Scotland to take a bold and radical step and vote Yes to independence in 2014."

SNP ministers, who want to hold a referendum in autumn 2014, have been holding talks with the UK government over the arrangements.

Yes Scotland, which has also won the support of the Scottish Socialist Party, is being billed as the biggest community based campaign in Scotland's history, designed to build a groundswell of support for an independent Scotland.

Meanwhile, former chancellor Alistair Darling, a Scottish Labour MP, pointed to a poll he had commissioned which suggested that 33% of those surveyed agreed that Scotland should become independent with 57% opposed and 10% undecided. The poll by YouGov took the views of 1,000 voters.

After the Yes Scotland launch, Mr Darling told the BBC: "The real problem that the nationalists have got is that their momentum has stalled and we can see from the poll that only one person in three has actually bought their message.

"I believe that people will come to see that we are better and stronger with the UK."

"I think that there are an awful lot of risks in simply walking away from the UK."

Mr Darling has been involved in meetings with Conservatives and Liberal Democrats to take forward the plans for a pro-union campaign which is expected to launch later this year.

 

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  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 459.

    @SuperJulianR
    You're kidding, right? The whole world will rush to set up fully-fledged embassies and new HQs in Edinburgh? You mean like those vast Embassy Districts in the small baltic states?
    There'll be a few new consulates in and around Charlotte Square or Holyrood...Sorted!
    On the flip side, Scotland would have to bear the cost of establishing its own consulate network wordwide. Ah! idealism.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 458.

    408.
    Mark F

    "Oh and as Scotland isn't in the EU, you can take back your workforce so we can sort our unemployment problems our."

    ----
    Scots workers are the least of your problem. Yesterday's migration figures showed that 600,000 new immigrants came to the UK last year.
    Oh and that does not include immigrants from within the EU, who are not even counted.

  • rate this
    -3

    Comment number 457.

    I am English living in England.

    And I fully support Scottish independence. So tired of their whining and moaning. So tired of their Scottish Labour MPs voting on matters that are nothing to do with them and so tired of Scotland returning Labour members of parliament.

    I see only good from Scotland going and I look forward to it.

    Goodbye!

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 456.

    438 ronnie, Sorry, but I am definately British, and English, and I have a loyalty to both, so yes you can have a combination of the two.

  • rate this
    +4

    Comment number 455.

    One comment: No.

  • rate this
    +5

    Comment number 454.

    Shetland oil for Shetland people. Not Holyrood.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 453.

    I think the SNP will have a bitter disappointment on their hands when they realise that people in Scotland from all walks of life are just not that interested in a free Scotland, I personall have not met anyone who has said otherwise.

  • rate this
    +4

    Comment number 452.

    Salmon just wants to be king. He is probably the most disingenous politician in our isles, and that is saying something. he says they have powerful and rich opposition. He runs scotland the poor wee thing. Trust him at your peril.

    He will want another referendum if he loses anyhow. Devo-max, is he not confident enought to win.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 451.

    I'm all for this. You can have RBS back (once you repay English taxpayers); you can have the oil back (it's running out anyway) and you can have your workforce back (English jobs for English workers).
    See ya!

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 450.

    It seems far more people who are against independence chant the "Freedom" line than those who are for it. Perhaps those who are for independence see that it's not about chocolate box nationalism, but for what's best for the people living here?
    To support independence because of mindless nationalism is idiotic, but to go against it because you believe that's all it is, is equally idiotic.

  • rate this
    +6

    Comment number 449.

    Agree that Scotland should be allowed to go and keep revenues from oil while paying UK back for RBS and the BOS part of deficit that required Lloyds TSB to be bailed out. I am also assuming that we would be closing all government offices, RAF and naval bases up there too and distributing jobs amongst the remaining members of the UK.?

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 448.

    I'm interested to hear what Ed Milliband has to say. At the moment the Scottish MP's give Labour a distinct advantage over the Tories in Westminster.

    If they go, then what?

    Personally I'm ambivient to Scotland going - what I've never undertood from the Scots is why so many seem to hate the English??

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 447.

    For me if Scotland go it will be a sad day. I have never felt English and proud to be British. Commonality of unity is strength and in these days an admirable aim, I can't imagine that division leads on to better things.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 446.

    It is up to the other members of the union on whether the Scots should be able to leave, and the terms on which they can do, is not a popular one with the moderator. Full referendum in all member states. The majority of people in the UK would be ambivalent. Balance should be done on finances. From start of union, If Scotland has taken more (incl. RBS) they should pay back + interest.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 445.

    perfectly happy for Scotland to be independent, as long as this means we stop subsidising their free prescriptions, higher education etc

  • rate this
    +6

    Comment number 444.

    NO, NO, NO

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 443.

    77.Joseph Madden

    Of course scotland can still use sterling; they just get no say in how it is administered; no say on interest rates; no say on monetary policy. Their borrowing costs would be astronomic due to poor credit ratings because they cannot control their own currency. Just look at what is happening in S. Europe. The banks in scotland would only be branches of english banks.

  • rate this
    +5

    Comment number 442.

    ... and will Scotland apply for membership of the European Community, The €uroZone, The Commonwealth, or will it become yet another insular part of the continent and the world? And how will it finance itself? With diminishing North Sea Gas revenues? Sale or Royal Residences? or increased taxes?? Come on, people of Scotland... THINK!!

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 441.

    People are easily confused. The RBS isn't just a Scottish bank. In fact, most of the board at the RBS are English; most of the assets and liabilities are not Scottish-based. It's completely ignorant to suggest that all its debt was run up by Scotland, purely on the basis that it has "Scotland" in its name. Grow up and learn about economics before you spout this rubbish.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 440.

    416 0xdeadbeef
    And who exactly has stated that? The SNP/Scottish Parliament? Of course they would never manipulate the figures. I contacted the GERS publisher and they didn't reply to any questions on how they got their figures.Have you read the Barnett Formula? I have and Scottish funding doesn't pay for a whole raft of UK expenditure let alone the cost of splitting.

 

Page 64 of 86

 

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  5.  
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  8.  
    11:55: Newsbeat

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  9.  
    11:47: More Brown

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    "I want the best for this country."

     
  10.  
    11:43: 'Lack of answers'

    Mr Darling adds: "Two days away and Alex Salmond is still refusing to answer basic questions about what independence would mean. He can't explain what would happen if firms start moving their headquarters away from Scotland, south of the border.

    alistair darling

    "And they don't need to do this, they don't want to do this. They are being forced to do this because of the uncertainties created by Alex Salmond's lack of answers."

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    "What could be more scary than not knowing what currency we would have if we vote for independence?"

     
  11.  
    11:42: Gordon Brown speaks

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    "For months we have been saying that the real way to change is not to separate off Scotland but to have a stronger Scottish Parliament.

    Gordon Brown

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  12.  
    11:36: No answers from economists Robert Peston Economics editor

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    "Scotland" rock

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  13.  
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    "Because our argument that Scotland is better and stronger as part of the UK is an argument that is finding more and more support from the quiet majority in Scotland. That is why I believe we will win on Thursday."

     
  14.  
    talkingpoint@bbc.co.uk 11:23: Get involved

    James Adams emails: It seems that we're now being offered a choice between Devo-max (awful name) and Independence lite. Both sides offering greater autonomy within a shared monetary, economic and trading union. Both promises require the backing of the UK government to work.

    Iain Steven, a small business owner, emails: A pledge, a vow, a Promise even a Contract, even signed by the political masters, BEWARE, even though they are the three party leaders, it is completely worthless. They are here representing the NO Campaign, NOT their parties.

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  15.  
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  16.  
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    Dundee United chairman Stephen Thompson

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    He added: "A 'Yes' vote will allow Scotland to maximise its potential on the world stage.

    "One of our biggest exports and assets has been our people from all walks of life, social and political background - and one of the greatest challenges we face is to grow job opportunities so more of our brightest youngsters stay and work here in Scotland.

    "There is no one better placed to make the best of Scotland than the people of Scotland and no amount of negativity from the 'No' campaign or media can change that."

     
  17.  
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  18.  
    10:36: More Curran

    "Compare that [the pro-Union offer] with the revelations we've had today about funding threats to the NHS - policies and issues and decisions that the SNP has tried to keep secret during this campaign," she added.

    "We have got a campaign of lies from the SNP who are trying to tell us that the NHS is under threat when in fact it is under threat from the SNP administration."

     
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  20.  
    Text 80295 10:33: Get involved

    Jim, Dunkeld: I run a small business, Scotland is made up of 70% small businesses, I had the self belief and confidence. I feel if there's a "Yes" vote it will bring self belief and confidence, it will encourage youngsters to go into business.

    James, Bearsden: I have no problem about who comes here, [but] where are all these people going to live? Housing will be overwhelmed.

     
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    "I ask the people of Scotland to lead that change of our whole British constitution."

     
  22.  
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  23.  
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  24.  
    talkingpoint@bbc.co.uk 09:56: Get involved

    In reply to Gladys from Aberdeenshire on Morning Call, James in Edinburgh emails: It is a valid point to ask if the Scottish government can set up all the departments needed. There won't actually be that many needed as the Scottish government already has most departments either set up or other departments able to take on the tasks.

    In reply to Paul from Dunblane on text, Neil from Falkirk emails: Scotland has voted for the Westminster government 14 times out of the last 21 elections, not bad for a country who never gets the government the majority vote for.

     
  25.  
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    Front pages 16 September

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  26.  
    Text 80295 09:40: Get involved

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  27.  
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  28.  
    09:20: Morning Call - your views

    Sandy, Ayrshire: I am voting Yes. One of the main reasons for voting Yes is saying goodbye to the Westminster system of politics. I am completely disillusioned. I am not voting Yes blindly.

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  29.  
    09:17: Press gang

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    Alex Salmond media scrum

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  30.  
    09:08: John Curtice Professor of politics at Strathclyde University

    There probably aren't that many people out there who are wholly undecided in the sense that they really are not clear at all whether they are going to vote 'Yes' or 'No'.

    Really, the battle is not so much about getting people who have no idea at all - there aren't too many of those - but rather those people who have got an inclination but they're still wavering. It's to persuade those people to go in one direction or the other.

     
  31.  
    Text 80295 09:00: Referendum - Your Views

    Irene, Brighton. What happens if it's a dead heat? Pistols at dawn with Salmond and Cameron? That I would pay good money to see!

    Paul, Dunblane: The basic tenet of democracy is that a nation gets the government it votes for. Scotland has not been a democracy for 300 years. A Yes vote changes that. A No vote and we cease to be even a country.

    Larissa, Fife: I feel we are guinea pigs in Mr Salmond's experiment. An experiment that has so many extraneous variables that it is not safe to run.

    John, Stirling: Surely what is now being offered should have been there BEFORE polling started? Almost 25% of electorate have already voted.

     
  32.  
    08:56: 'Scaremongering falls on deaf ears'

    Mr Salmond concluded: "I think no-one seriously thinks that this land is not capable of running its own finances.

    Alex Salmond

    "All of the scaremongering is going to fall on deaf ears. We have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity."

     
  33.  
    08:52: 'Mythical package'

    Mr Salmond describes the pledge signed by the leaders of the three main Westminster parties that there will be more powers for the Scottish Parliament as the "mythical package of nothing".

     
  34.  
    08:50: 'Sustainable borrowing'

    Asked whether an independent Scotland would have to pay more to borrow money, the first minister replies: "No, you have to have sustainable level of borrowing and debt. As far as the cost is concerned, we'll be borrowing at Sterling rates."

     
  35.  
    08:49: Economic criticisms

    Asked why many companies and financial experts are criticisng plans for a an independent Scotland, Mr Salmond replies: "Many economic experts take a different view," and mentions Nobel prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz, who recently criticised the "scaremongering".

    He claims the Scottish government is building "better schools and better hospitals" through capital funding, rather than having money "creamed off" by private companies in PFI arrangements.

     
  36.  
    08:39: Salmond on GMS

    First Minister Alex Salmond is live on Good Morning Scotland.

    Responding to Alistair Darling's claim that the SNP is cutting NHS funds and there is a £400m funding gap, Mr Salmond says this is "absolutely untrue".

    "Our plans show a real-terms increase in spending - the first time the health service budget has ever passed the £12bn mark," he adds.

     
  37.  
    08:28: View from the Borders

    Good Morning Scotland has been reporting from the Borders this morning.

    Bob Burgess, deputy editor of local newspaper the Southern Reporter, said the question of boundaries and currency had been among the key issues for people in the area.

    He told Gary Robertson: "We have had to expand our letters pages quite dramatically."

     
  38.  
    08:20: Morning Call Louise White Presenter, Morning Call

    Coming up, have you seen or heard anything specific which has helped you decide how you are going to vote in the referendum?

    From the economy to health, from business to currency, let's have your questions and your comments.

    Louise White

    Lines are open now - call 0500 929500 text 80295 or email morningcallscotland@bbc.co.uk

     
  39.  
    08:11: Tim Reid Political correspondent, BBC News

    Darling: "What you have is an undertaking. A promise. That if we say no to independence we will get the change most people want"

     
  40.  
    08:10: Tim Reid Political correspondent, BBC News

    Darling struggling to explain how pro union parties can "guarantee" powers other than "will be an awful lot quicker" than independence.

     
  41.  
    08:06: Salmond coming up...

    First Minister Alex Salmond will be speaking to Good Morning Scotland after 08:30.

    You can listen to the programme at the top of this page.

     
  42.  
    08:05: 'Energised and divided'

    Speaking about the nature of the campaign, Douglas Alexander said: "This campaign has both energised Scotland and it has divided Scotland. There's a heavy burden of responsibility on everyone involved in this campaign to conduct ourselves in a manner that means on Friday morning, whatever the result, we can bring Scotland together and we can move Scotland forward. I hope that is an approach that will be taken by everybody."

    yes/no
     
  43.  
    08:04: More Darling

    Mr Darling told BBC Scotland: "You can have a stronger, more secure Scottish Parliament.

    "Why on earth break up the entire thing? If we vote to leave, if it all goes wrong, we can't go back."

     
  44.  
    08:03: Guardian poll

    More than six out of 10 people in England and Wales believe the UK government should not enter into a currency union with an independent Scotland, according to a poll in the Guardian.

    Scottish notes

    The poll also finds that 56% of those who responded would be "saddened" if Scotland votes to be independent.

     
  45.  
    07:55: 'One-party state'

    Labour MP Douglas Alexander has dismissed Yes campaign claims that independence is the only way to get the government Scotland votes for.

    On BBC Breakfast he said: "I've got two governments that I didn't vote for and didn't support. I've got a Scottish National Party government in Edinburgh and I've got a Conservative-Liberal government in Westminster. So the only way you always get the government you vote for is in a one-party state and I don't think anybody is recommending that."

     
  46.  
    07:53: Darling on the NHS

    Alistair Darling, campaign leader of Better Together, has been speaking about the NHS this morning.

    He told Good Morning Scotland: "What we are saying is if we vote No, work will start on Friday morning on increased powers, particularly to raise additional funds.

    Alistair Darling

    "You can have a stronger more secure health service if we vote No.

    "The Scottish Parliament has the power to spend money, it will have the power to raise additional money, it can borrow more."

     
  47.  
    07:51: 'Massive opportunity'

    Ms Sturgeon added: "They [the pro-Union parties] are treating voters in Scotland with contempt."

    Asked if a "Yes" vote guarantees "better lives" for people in Scotland, she replied: "Independence is not a magic wand, but it is a massive opportunity.

    "We can make life better, not overnight, but over time."

     
  48.  
    07:49: Sturgeon: 'No guarantees'

    Deputy First Minister Nicola Sturgeon has been responding to the offer of new powers put forward by the pro-Union parties.

    Nicola Sturgeon

    Speaking on BBC Breakfast, Ms Sturgeon said: "If there was a serious intention to deliver more powers, why hasn't that happened before now?

    "Tory MPs, including Christopher Chope, have already said they would block more powers. If we vote No, there are no guarantees at all."

     
  49.  
    07:39: 'Faster change'

    Asked if the move smacks of panic, Mr Alexander told BBC Breakfast: "I don't think there's any embarrassment about placing policies on the front page of papers with just days two go.

    "I think the 'Yes' campaign are struggling. They had an avalanche of facts engulfed in assertions last week when it was announced every major Scottish bank would move their registered office to London.

    "The economic risks suddenly became very real last week, and at the same time we are offering what I believe most of us here in Scotland want which is faster, safer and better change."

     
  50.  
    07:35: More Alexander

    "That pledge, that vow that we can have faster, safer, better change is actually a vision around which Scotland can unite," he adds.

     
  51.  
    07:34: 'Best of both worlds'

    Shadow Foreign Secretary Douglas Alexander has denied the powers pledge made by the pro-Union parties has come too late in the referendum debate.

    douglas alexander

    Mr Alexander told the BBC: "Here in Scotland, we have been talking about these powers for many months. What we are saying today is we can have the best of both worlds. We can have a stronger Scottish parliament but with the strength, stability and security of the United Kingdom."

     
  52.  
    Text 80295 07:34: Your views

    Frank, Helensburgh: The party leaders DO NOT have the powers to give away extra powers to the Scots

    J S Crieff: Vote no for stability not this daft idea of independence.

     
  53.  
    07:32: Yes response

    The Yes campaign claims the offer of further devolution signed up to by the leaders of all three main Westminster parties would give Scotland the power to raise only 30% of its taxes.

     
  54.  
    07:24: SNP chief executive Peter Murrell

    tweets: Promises Promises #Rattled

    Cameron and Miliband
     
  55.  
    07:19: Too late? Iain Watson Political correspondent, BBC News

    The problem all along, and this is what people would tell you privately in the "No" campaign, is that there is a very sharp argument between independence and all the risks it brings and staying with the UK.

    What they didn't do early enough, some of them would say, is put forward the alternative. They came up with a phrase which they used back in June when they said '"No" doesn't mean no change'. But they weren't clear what the change would actually be.

    Now they are emphasising it, now it's on the front page of a tabloid and some people think perhaps they've left this a little bit too late. And certainly it's quite difficult if you're using complicated arguments to get through to people who are first time voters, 16-year-olds, who have never voted in their life before.

     
  56.  
    Email: talkingpoint@bbc.co.uk 07:15: Get involved

    Everybody's talking about it...

    We want to hear your thoughts on the referendum itself, and the two campaigns. Tweet us using #bbcindyref, email us here or text 80295.

    If you are texting, don't forget to include your name and where you come from.

     
  57.  
    07:09: Media village Emma Ailes BBC Scotland

    With the referendum just two days away, the world's media is intensifying its gaze on Scotland.

    Media village

    At the Scottish Parliament in Edinburgh, preparations are under way to host hundreds of journalists and news crews from around the globe.

    A broadcast village with flood lights and scaffolding two storeys high has been erected in the grounds around Holyrood. From here, reporters will broadcast live.

     
  58.  
    06:57: 'Adds intensity'

    Calum Kerr, of Yes Scotland Borders, told Good Morning Scotland: "Bit by bit I have become massively involved. It's people that have never been interested in politics, they see a genuine opportunity for change.

    "It's a different challenge here, the proximity of the border adds an intensity.

    "A girl said we rely on England - the Morrisons is just across the border. You will still be able to go there."

     
  59.  
    06:49: On the campaign trail

    Scotland's desire for political and economic change has been heard and will be delivered, Ed Miliband will promise today.

    The Labour leader will insist a "vote for 'No' is a vote for change".

    Meanwhile, rival campaigners will argue independence would bring either a "golden opportunity" or "separation and risk".

    With just 48 hours until voters go to the polls, Deputy First Minister Nicola Sturgeon and Finance Secretary John Swinney will be talking to apprentices in Renfrew.

    Liberal Democrat MPs Charles Kennedy and Danny Alexander will be joined by MSP Willie Rennie to highlight "the positive things that Scotland and the UK have achieved together".

    Shadow Foreign Secretary Douglas Alexander will be campaigning in Edinburgh's financial district.

     
  60.  
    06:42: Border line

    Good Morning Scotland has been speaking to campaigners in the Scottish Borders on both sides of the independence debate.

    Michelle Ballantye, for Better Together, told BBC Scotland: "I think it's a bit of a nonsense we need to be independent to be fairer.

    "I think the Borders has a strong sense of being part of the UK. Our sense of connection is very strong."

     
  61.  
    06:25: Leaders pledge more powers

    The leaders of the three main Westminster parties have signed a pledge to devolve more powers to Scotland if there's a No vote.

    The pledge has been signed by David Cameron, Ed Miliband and Nick Clegg and appears on the front of the Daily Record newspaper.

    Daily Record

    It includes promises of "extensive new powers" for the Scottish Parliament.

    Prime Minister David Cameron has denied the move is a panic measure.

    He said: "I always said right from the start of this campaign, if Scotland voted 'No' to separation, the rest of the United Kingdom would say 'Yes' to further devolution.

    david cameron, ed miliband and nick clegg

    "If Scotland wants more devolution - and I think Scotland should have more devolution - you have to answer the prior question 'Do you want to stay in the United Kingdom?'

    "And of course that wasn't just my view; that was the view of the leaders of other United Kingdom parties who all thought it was important. Let's settle the question of separation and then look at devolution."

     
  62.  
    06:13: Good Morning Marianne Taylor BBC Scotland news

    Good morning and welcome to Referendum Live, your minute-by-minute guide to all today's news, comment and analysis from both sides of the campaign.

    With just two full days of campaigning left, and with the polls so close, the stakes couldn't be higher.

     

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