Scottish wild salmon wins protected status

Salmon during the journey up the Tweed river in the Scottish Borders The ruling means salmon caught in other countries cannot be called Scottish wild salmon

Scottish wild salmon is to join the likes of Parma ham, Melton Mowbray pork pies and champagne in becoming a protected product.

The fish is to be granted protected geographical indication (PGI) status, meaning it has a particular quality attributable to its place of origin.

It means salmon caught in other countries cannot be packaged, sold or advertised as Scottish wild salmon.

The ruling by the European Commission comes into effect in 20 days.

Scottish farmed salmon was awarded PGI status in 2004.

Scottish Salmon Producers' Organisation chief executive Scott Landsburgh said: "PGI status has helped to enhance the reputation of farmed salmon in major export markets.

"It is a good promotional tool and helps to protect against imitation.

"We hope the new award for Scottish wild salmon brings commercial success too."

The salmon will join a list of about 1,000 products which are protected by the legislation, including Scottish beef and lamb.

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