Aberdeen subsea company to create 60 jobs

Rovop employee Rovop said the new vehicles would complement its existing fleet of mid-size machines

Related Stories

Energy services firm Rovop is to create about 60 jobs following the purchase of five new remotely operated vehicles (ROVs).

The Aberdeen-based subsea specialist will invest around £15m over the next 18 months in the work class hydraulic machines.

The vehicles are being supplied by FMC Schilling Robotics.

Rovop said the investment was in response to "continual high demand" for its fleet.

The first of the new vehicles will be ready for use in January.

The company said it would create skilled ROV pilot-technician posts and provide comprehensive training programmes for existing electrical and mechanical engineers.

The first 12 new recruits are set to leave Aberdeen next month to undertake intensive training at FMC Schilling Robotics' facilities in California.

The new heavy-duty ROVs will complement mid-size machines already operated by Rovop. They will be made available to global oil companies, offshore construction, inspection repair and maintenance (IRM) and survey clients.

'Significant milestone'

Rovop managing director Steven Gray said: "This represents a significant milestone in the development of Rovop.

"We will now be operating the most modern, capable and reliable fleet of ROVs in our market.

"Our new vehicles will enable us to carry out heavy work as well as more complex automated tasks subsea.

"The demand for our expertise and service continues to grow strongly and we expect that to continue as our fleet increases in size, power and capability."

Rovop is also investing about £250,000 in a state-of-the-art ROV simulator.

The simulator, also provided by FMC Schilling Robotics, will allow personnel to undergo situational training, as well as rehearsing tasks and scenarios before heading offshore.

More on This Story

Related Stories

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

More Scotland business stories

RSS

Features

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.