Education Scotland looks to expand use of tablets computers in schools

A person using an iPad Pupils in some Scottish schools already use tablet computers

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The use of mobile devices and tablet computers in Scottish classrooms could be expanded in a bid to modernise teaching and learning.

Pupils in some schools are already using iPads and Android technology.

Government agency, Education Scotland, is to consider how digital devices could be used on a wider scale.

Education Secretary Mike Russell, who visited Sciennes Primary in Edinburgh where Ipads are being piloted, said he wanted to see best value for schools.

According to the Scottish government, 10 local authorities, almost 20 schools and hundreds of pupils are already using a range of digital technology.

Two years ago the private Cedars School of Excellence in Greenock claimed it had become the first school in the world to give every pupil an iPad.

Last year some concerns were raised over a controversial proposal for parents at an Aberdeen primary to lease tablet computers for their children to use in class.

Education Scotland said it would be "taking stock" of how pilots schemes were working.

Mr Russell said: "The range of mobile devices that are now available and the promise of what they can bring to teaching and learning is very exciting and something that must be embraced.

"There are a number of pilots already under way around the country.

"I have asked Education Scotland for recommendations on how we can realise the benefits of mobile technology for all learners in Scotland, including ensuring how we get the best possible value for our schools, and whether national guidance is needed for the sector."

He added: "I want to drive forward a culture change in Scottish education and ensure new technologies can be embedded into learning."

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